7 Ways You Can Invite Constructive Feedback

Receiving correction—or constructive feedback—is difficult for anyone. (Photo by Amy Hirschi on Unsplash)

I remember an especially hard year as a leader. It was so bad several members of our staff told me where I was letting them down.

So much for having an "open-door policy." The next year, I closed the door.

Not really, but this was a year where staff members said to me, "I have a problem with you." They may not have used those exact words, but the point was clear—I can be an idiot at times. There were significant areas where I needed to improve. Thankfully, I haven't had many of those years, but I'm glad now I had the ones I have, because they have taught me a lot about my leadership.

There is room for improvement with any leader, and maturing leaders welcome instruction from the people they are trying to lead.

Get Spirit-filled content delivered right to your inbox! Click here to subscribe to our newsletter.

Most of the time when I've been corrected by someone I'm supposed to lead, I deserved it. Plus, anytime someone on a team is brave enough to rebuke their leader, you can be assured he or she is either:

—Desperate and willing to do anything.

—Ignorant or doesn't care.

—Feels welcome to do so.

In my opinion, good leaders try to create environments to live within the third option. I hope this was the case in my situation.

I should also say, especially on behalf of my fellow senior leaders, that criticism comes easily to leaders. We don't have to ask for it. Do anything at all in leadership and someone will have a problem with it—and they won't always be kind in how they voice their complaint. I like to say, "You can't see what I see until you sit where I sit." Leading is hard, and I am not suggesting we make it harder.

But I'm not talking about the negative type of criticism. I am referring to constructive feedback from people I care about and who respect me. We all need that at times.

Here are seven ways to welcome correction from the people we lead:

  1. An open door. My work environment is somewhat different now, because we have a very remote working environment. As pastor of a large staff, it was even more important to keep the door to my office open. But it was more than simply the door. As a leader, I try to make my schedule available to the people I lead. And if I'm in the office, my door is "open" and I want people to know they can walk in anytime. In addition, I try to help teams I lead know that I consider responsiveness to be of highest value to me. If they contact me, I will attempt to answer in a timely manner.
  2. Include others in decision-making. If a decision affects more people than me, then I want more people helping to make the decision. This is true even if it's a natural decision for me to make. The more I include people in the decision-making, the more likely they are to want to follow the decisions made. In fact, I seldom make decisions alone.
  3. Ask for it. Consistently, throughout the year, I ask people to tell me what they think. I ask lots of questions. I solicit opinions on almost every major decision I make. It's a risky move, because many will give opinions, but it's invaluable insight. And the more you ask, the more freedom people feel in sharing.
  4. Admit mistakes. It's important that I recognize when decisions made are my fault. People feel more comfortable approaching leaders who don't feel they are always right.
  5. Take personal responsibility. In addition to admitting fault, I must own my share of projects and responsibility. The team needs to know I'm on their side and in their corner. When they are criticized, I own the criticism with them. I have their back. (By the way, this is only learned by experience.)
  6. Model it. It's one thing to say I welcome correction, but when correction comes, I must model receiving it well. If I overreact when correction comes, I'll limit the times I receive it. If I chooser retribution, I've shut further feedback off before it comes.
  7. Trade it. The best way to get a team to offer healthy correction of the leader is to create a relationship with the team where there is mutual constructive feedback. The goal is not for the leader to receive all the correction. The goal is for correction to be applied where correction is needed.

I should also say all these are still not enough. Constructive criticism from people who care about you and want your best, especially from people you lead, only develops over time as trust is developed. They have to trust you, and you have to trust them.

Receiving correction—or constructive feedback—is difficult for anyone, perhaps seemingly unnatural for most leaders. I believe, however, when a leader is open to healthy correction from his or her team, the team will be more willing to follow the leader wherever he or she goes.

Leader, are you open to correction? Is your leader open to correction?

Ron Edmondson is the CEO of Leadership Network. Previously, he was a pastor, revitalizing two churches and planting two churches. He is passionate about planting churches, but also helping established churches thrive. He loves assisting pastors and those in ministry think through leadership, strategy and life. His specialty is organizational leadership.

For the original article, visit ronedmondson.com.

Get Spirit-filled content delivered right to your inbox! Click here to subscribe to our newsletter.

Dr. Steve Greene is now sharing stories, teachings, and conversations with guests who lead with love on Love Leads, a new podcast. Listen now.


Help Charisma stay strong for years to come as we report on life in the Spirit. Become an integral part of Charisma’s work by joining Charisma Media Partners. Click here to keep us strong!

Dr. Mark Rutland's

National Institute of Christian Leadership (NICL)

The NICL is one of the top leadership training programs in the U.S. taught by Dr. Mark Rutland. If you're the type of leader that likes to have total control over every aspect of your ministry and your future success, the NICL is right for you!

FREE NICL MINI-COURSE - Enroll for 3-hours of training from Dr. Rutland's full leadership course. Experience the NICL and decide if this training is right for you and your team.

Do you feel stuck? Do you feel like you’re not growing? Do you need help from an expert in leadership? There is no other leadership training like the NICL. Gain the leadership skills and confidence you need to lead your church, business or ministry. Get ready to accomplish all of your God-given dreams. CLICK HERE for NICL training dates and details.

The NICL Online is an option for any leader with time or schedule constraints. It's also for leaders who want to expedite their training to receive advanced standing for Master Level credit hours. Work through Dr. Rutland's full training from the comfort of your home or ministry at your pace. Learn more about NICL Online. Learn more about NICL Online.

Your Turn

Comment Guidelines
View/Add Comments
Charisma Leader — Serving and empowering church leaders