Page 23 of 26

Leaders in Crisis

The perils of this present age demand of us a decisive move to intercession and action. read more

Good Shepherds

We need more pastors like Tommy Barnett--engaged with things that matter.

Our associate editor, Matthew Green, formerly served as an associate pastor. It seemed fitting to me that he write the editorial for our fivefold emphasis on pastoring. Read and be challenged!

I've worked with pastors whose skills and professionalism could have landed them high-paying jobs in the business world, and I've served others whose gifts were better suited for the Teamsters' union. Tommy Barnett, whom I had the privilege of interviewing for this issue (see "Dream Weaver," page 38), belongs in the first group.

Pastors of large churches like Phoenix First Assembly aren't entrusted with their burgeoning flocks just because of an ability to manage programs and invent new church- growth schemes. God has seen fit to bless their ministries because He has created them with gifts tailor-made for their unique situations.

From my brief time with Pastor Barnett, here are a few observations of the types of people that God often calls to fulfill the ministry of the shepherd:

Simplicity: While the world may extol the virtues of a complex person able to weigh options, calculate risk and analyze potential, a good pastor keeps it simple: "Preach the Word, and love people," my father--himself a pastor--once advised me.

It's not that a pastor is disengaged from the complexities of life, but he or she has the ability to immediately sift through challenging enigmas, separating the eternal from the temporary. It's no wonder that the effective ministry of a pastor surrounds the three things that are anything but temporary: God, His Word and people.

Focus: Successful pastors like Tommy Barnett have the uncanny ability to focus--not just on the lofty goals that keep them in the prayer closet and the board room, but also on the individuals who sit in their offices seeking counsel.

When you're in a room talking with Pastor Barnett, you and he are the only ones there. Not that this comes naturally. If anything, the gift of focus is one that must be honed and practiced, as one's ministry grows and one's sphere of influence broadens.

Dependency: Once again, this is not a sought-after quality, but without it a pastor will become a smoldering wick in a matter of years. Leaders like Tommy Barnett constantly extol the value of those whom they lead, recognizing that their effectiveness is contingent on the partnership of those who share their visions. They have learned to depend on God--and others.

Good pastors revel in the productive service of those whom they lead--even when it has the potential of eclipsing their own ministries. Unthreatened, they recognize this for what it truly is: an indication of their own fruitfulness.

May God raise up more pastors like Tommy Barnett--simply engaged with the things that matter, focused on God and His people and willing to take the risk of dependence.

Matthew Green is associate editor of Ministries Today. He invites your comments and questions at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . read more

Pray With Power

To isolate doubt and release faith, church leaders need to dissolve superstitions about divine sovereignty that people inherit from culture and religious traditions. read more

Sharpen Your Leading Edge

Are you looking for ways to maximize your leadership potential? The true leader's 'edge' is found in pursuing the disciplined life. read more

Vital Stats

A look at what current statistics say about pastors--and about God.

There's probably not a pastor in the United States who isn't familiar with--or hasn't heavily quoted--Christian pollster George Barna. Whether the subject is church growth, the views of the unchurched or the attitudes of those sitting in the pews, the prolific author and founder of Barna Research Group has studied it and can cite a revealing statistic. His conclusions drawn from myriad scientific research data have compelled many pastors to rethink their approach to ministry. That's why we thought our readers would enjoy a closer look at the man behind the stats and his challenge to today's spiritual leaders. (See our cover story on page 28.)

The Bible itself teems with number crunching, suggesting such activity has spiritual implications. Moses counted the tribes of Israel; offerings and animal sacrifices were counted; troops preparing for battle were numbered; and salvations were tabulated. Even God crunches numbers. He numbers our days (see Job 14:5); He counts--and names--the stars (see Ps. 147:4); He even numbers the hairs on our heads (see Luke 12:7). Let Barna try that one!

Analyzing statistical data is important because it not only gives you insight into your current situation, but also helps you gauge the direction you're heading so that you make better decisions.

We at Ministries Today compile statistics through various means, including our monthly online poll for pastors and church leaders (www.ministriestoday.com). Although the results are purely a reflection of the views of those who take the poll as opposed to a truly scientific survey, they are nonetheless quite insightful. Some stats from recent polls you may find intriguing: When asked what causes them the most stress, 31 percent of pastors said personal finances; only 11 percent worried as much about church finances. But nearly 20 percent--the second highest reply--said private issues are what cause them the most concern.

"Totally fulfilled and satisfied" was the phrase almost 30 percent of pastors used to describe their career satisfaction. Close to 24 percent chose "somewhat fulfilled" and 19 percent picked "mostly fulfilled." On the down side, 17 percent chose "struggling but hanging in there," 7 percent said "dissatisfied but hanging in there," while 3 percent chose "I want to throw in the towel."

It's in those rough patches of ministry where we need to remember the most important stats of all: God's mercy toward us is measureless (see Ps. 103:11; 100:5); His loving thoughts toward us are greater in number than the earth's sand (see Ps. 139:17-18); and His grace is abounding (see 2 Cor. 9:8; 12:9). Those are statistics we can rely on. read more


Use Desktop Layout
Ministry Today Magazine — Serving and empowering church leaders