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A Twist of Faith

When it comes to talking with my friends in the Word-Faith movement, I'll take dialogue over diatribe any day. read more

Time for an "Oral Review"

Oral Roberts' legacy is still teaching us the importance of pursuing a ministry that is both supernatural and substantive. read more

Passing the Test of Time

Culture, methods and technology change. Here are 10 principles for building a ministry that will leave eternal results. read more

The Genuine Article

If the Holy Spirit truly showed up in our churches, would we be able to discern the difference between the real and the counterfeit? read more

Yesterday's Leader

Beware the habits of moral compromise that steal the approval of God—and the credibility of men and women. read more

Teach the Second Coming

My time with Oral Roberts reminded me of a preaching topic I've been sadly neglecting: the return of Christ. read more

The Unusual Suspects

True apostleship is not a matter of aspiration but of obedience.

Who in the world would ever want to be an apostle? Lest we think it an avenue of worldly advancement, let's ponder the plight foretold by Jesus for apostles: at best, persecution; at worst, death (see Luke 11:49; Matt. 10:17).

Lest we think it a role reserved for the intellectually or spiritually superior, let's recall how Matthew was chosen: with a pair of dice (see Acts 1:26).

Lest we think it a path to the finer things in life, let's remember Paul's station: "hungry ... thirsty ... in rags ... homeless ..." (1 Cor 4:11, NIV).

No, apostleship is not a matter of aspiration but of obedience. It's a divine call that often comes unexpectedly upon those whom God chooses--not necessarily those who would appear to have all the talent, charisma and spiritual power needed to fill the shoes of an apostle.

Sure, apostles are those who have made themselves available for the purposes of God, and they are often gifted with passion and skills fitting their callings. But most ultimately find themselves dumbfounded by the ways in which He ends up using them in His kingdom.

I must confess that I've been dubious about the existence of modern-day apostles. Like C. Peter Wagner, I'm no fan of the self-appointed ones. And I'm not sure whether I like using the title as a form of address. (As a second-generation Pentecostal, "brother" or "sister" works just fine for me.)

But my skeptical leanings were cured by talking to Samuel Lee and Kayy Gordon and reading about Zhang Rongliang in preparation for "Apostles Among Us".

Each of these are consumed with the desire to see others pick up the baton of ministry and go further than they have. And they are too busy equipping pastors and strategizing how to reach nations to worry about titles.

The "apostle debate" is not over yet: Will denominations seek to encourage apostolic church-planting and mentorship models that are bearing so much fruit in the non-Western world?

Will apostolic networks address the concerns of accountability and sound theology--all while warding off the trend toward institutionalism that threatens historic denominations?

Both must avoid the triumphalistic notion that God works through only one type of church structure and accept the fact that ecclesiastical governments are only temporary. They exist for the sake of the church's function, which is to equip the saints--until Jesus returns.

As you read this issue of Ministries Today, I hope you'll find--like I did--that wherever God is building His church, apostles are laying the foundation.

The titles they wear may differ with the expressions of time and culture, but their function is the same: plant congregations, equip leaders, confront demonic powers and marshal resources for kingdom purposes.

Even the crustiest of skeptics would agree.

Matthew Green is managing editor of Ministries Today. He invites your comments and questions at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . read more


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