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Leadership

If you're older, do yourself a favor and learn how to relate to Millennials.
If you're older, do yourself a favor and learn how to relate to Millennials. (Getty Images )

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I'm not sure when it happened, but somewhere along the way, I became the old guy on our church staff.

I don't think of myself as old. I'm social-media savvy. I text on my iPhone 7-plus. I don't use it, but I even have a Snapchat account (I'm not sure why.).

Of course, I don't wear skinny jeans, spike my hair, have a long beard or have the coolest eyeglasses. I don't sleep more than six or seven hours a night. I still say "dude," and I enjoy a mid-afternoon power nap. I also now qualify for the senior discount at a growing number of places.

Okay, at almost 60, maybe I am old, but I'm learning some things about relating to millennials. I'll get there in a second, but let's first attempt to describe who is what.

The generation breakdown is a bit difficult to define. In fact, the census bureau doesn't classify the different generations except for boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964, who are roughly 52-70 years old).

The media, or some self-proclaimed pundit somewhere, have said that Gen-Xers are those born between 1965 and 1981, those who are 35-51. Millennials are typically those under 35, born between 1982 and 2004.

I've never been a big fan of pigeonholing people, and there are plenty of folks who defy definition, but I recognize that some significant differences exist among these age groups.

That being said, how does a boomer love and care for a staff comprised of some Gen-Xers and lots of millennials?

Here are seven lessons I'm learning:

1. Be a good listener. If you're a pastor, you've told couples a thousand times, "You'll see some major improvements in your marriage if you work on your listening skills." We all know how important this is, but we senior pastors (pun intended) have a nasty habit of liking the sound of our own voice when it comes to managing staff. However, it's better to ask insightful and useful questions and to listen sincerely. You'll make great headway with a Gen-Xer or millennial who feels genuinely heard.

2. Clearly define your expectations. Listen first and listen well, but you'll avoid a lot of frustration with everyone if you work hard to spell out what you want (or don't want) and when you need it. Communication is a challenge when assumptions are made and ambivalence and indecision are present.

3. Pick your battles. On a regular basis, while being challenged by one of the young bucks on my staff or in other areas of my life, I'm consciously thinking, How much does this truly matter? Is this a hill worth dying on? Be honest. When it's all said and done, does their way conflict with your ultimate goal? If you've defined the "win" (your clear expectations), it's okay to give a lot of latitude to those doing the work. Of course, there are times when you should pull rank and say, "Thank you for your input, but this is what you're going to do." Just make sure those times are done in love and after you've listened to them well. Also, learn to under-react rather than over-react.

4. Don't get defensive. Millennials are sometimes combative. I know that's a generalization and not always true, but it is a common trait among the young. They rarely lack an opinion, and they often won't back off until they feel valued and heard (review the point above about listening). Yes, it's irritating when it seems like you aren't being respected and your experience is being rejected or discounted as irrelevant, but take a deep breath and work hard not to be aggressive, defensive, or cynical because doing so never ends well for anyone. Remember, millennials want to be valued (which is a good thing), and their opinions matter too.

5. Be mindful of the common ground you probably have with millennials. Keep in mind, many boomers (myself included) once were the arrogant, cocky, self-absorbed, know-it-alls who challenged everybody. Sooner or later, most people figure out that the generation before them weren't all idiots and that experience actually does matter.

6. Lead by example. Words matter. Actions matter more. If you want them to work hard—then work hard. If you want them to have a servant's heart—serve. If you want them to listen more and talk less—listen more. If you want them to learn from their elders and be teachable—you keep learning too. Being a lifelong learner isn't easy. At my age, I've caught myself thinking, I deserve a break. I shouldn't have to work 10-12 hour days anymore. Where's that life cruise-control button? But relevance and respect must be earned, even if you're old.

7. Be patient. If heading up a church staff and being the lead pastor were easy, you probably wouldn't be needed. Believe me when I say, staff challenges are common. Put two or more humans together and some conflict is inevitable. Be patient with your young staff, and be patient with yourself.

Mistakes will happen. People will fail you, and you will fail them, but failure is always an opportunity for change and growth.

I'm thankful for the younger staff who surround me. I believe in them, and I see enormous potential for the future of the church led by these young people. I deeply value the input and perspective of the young. In many ways, my church is what it is because of the millennials who contribute so much to who we are and what we do.

Sure, you and I might be old, but God's not done with us yet. We still have the opportunity to shape the generations in our wake. Whether we do or don't will have a lot to do with our attitude.

Kurt W. Bubna is an author, blogger, conference speaker, NW Regional Purpose Driven director and the senior pastor of Eastpoint Church in Spokane Valley, Washington. Bubna published his first book, Epic Grace: Chronicles of a Recovering Idiot, with Tyndale in 2013. He has also published Mr. & Mrs.: How to Thrive in Perfectly Imperfect Marriage, and several other books. For more information, please visit kurtbubna.com.

For the original article, visit pastors.com.

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