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Do Something

A Servant’s Heart Pleases God

Some people you meet change your life forever.

When I met Abeba, a beautiful, sweet and special little girl in one of our Joyce Meyer Ministries feeding programs in Ethiopia, she was severely malnourished. Her little body was swollen, already in the shut-down mode of starvation. Many in her village were starving, but she was one of the worst cases.

The thing that blew me away about Abeba was her joy. Despite how much pain she was in from malnutrition and her living conditions, Abeba’s smile always glowed. I had the opportunity to give food to Abeba’s mother for Abeba and her nine brothers and sisters. They were visibly happy and thankful just to have something to eat. Often, the food our ministry provides in this region is the difference between life and death for many of these children and families. Abeba now had a new shot at life. read more

worldliness

Has the Spirit of the World Entered Your Congregation?

The head of a large missionary organization told me that they are being sued by two of their members. These people had earlier dedicated their lives to missions.

Now they have various ailments. One man has ulcers. A woman, who lived in the tropics, has skin cancer. A "Christian" lawyer, hearing of their problems, advised them to sue the missionary organization. Their afflictions, he says, are "job related."

The mission director shook his head. "They were willing to give their lives—but I guess that didn't include stomach and skin." The missionaries and their lawyer have been infected with what Paul called "the spirit of the world" (1 Cor. 2:12).

Despite the classic Pentecostal definition, worldliness (the Greek word is kosmos) is far more than cosmetics. It is also more than R-rated movies or X-rated prostitutes. Worldliness is focusing on the things of time rather than things eternal. read more

Did You Miss This in the News?

Check out some links below to recent stories from Charisma News that you'll find interesting and informative. You can also sign up to receive stories on your smart phone by signing up for the free Charisma News app by clicking here.

VBS-MainGraphic

Your Guide to VBS 2013

We’ve done the legwork for you. Here’s everything you need to know to create and customize a VBS experience for your church and community.

 

 

Abingdon-HipHopHopeABINGDON PRESS

2013.abingdonpressvbs.com
Hip-Hop Hope: Jesus Makes Me Glad

Theme: Hip-hop culture is global! Surprisingly, its original goal was “Love, Peace, Unity and Having Fun!” Hip-Hop Hope: Jesus Makes Me Glad offers Jesus as the ultimate DJ who scratches out new songs of hope.

 

 

AnswersInGenesisANSWERS IN GENESIS
answersvbs.com
The Kingdom Chronicles: Standing Strong in the Battle for Truth  

Theme: With The Kingdom Chronicles VBS, brave knights and fair maidens will be equipped to put on the full armor of God so they can stand strong in the battle for truth.

 

 

 

BogardPress-TheMightyGodBOGARD PRESS
vbs.bogardpress.org
The Mighty God: God Leads Moses and Me

Theme: This study from the book of Exodus explores how God led Moses through the perils of his life and remained faithful to him in extreme circumstances. Children will learn the ways that God loves us, calls us, saves us guides us and cares for us.

 

 

 

 

Cokesbury-EverywhereFunFairCOKESBURY
2013.cokesburyvbs.com
Everywhere Fun Fair: Where God’s World Comes Together  

Theme: Everywhere Fun Fair is a global celebration with the look and feel of a world's fair. Children will discover that God’s love can be found everywhere—even in their own neighborhoods.

 

 

Concordia-TellItCONCORDIA PUBLISHING HOUSE 
vbs.cph.org
Tell It on the Mountain: Where Jesus Christ Is Lord   

Theme: Get ready for a mountaintop experience! At Tell It on the Mountain, children will learn about the one true God through five mountaintop Bible accounts. This VBS features active Bible storytelling, energetic songs and Peak Performance videos for opening and closing.

 


EditorialConcordia-AventurasGlacialesEDITORIAL CONCORDIA 
(CONCORDIA PUBLISHING HOUSE) 
editorial.cph.org
Aventuras Glaciales (Cool Adventures)  

Theme: Five children receive a surprise trip and receive great gifts from God: forgiveness, salvation, joy, life and hope. 

 

 

GospelLight-SonWestRoundupGOSPEL LIGHT 
myvbsparty.com
SonWest Roundup: A Rip-Roarin’ Good Time With Jesus!  

Theme: This comprehensive VBS package uses a Wild West backdrop to help kids discover Jesus in the stories of Moses.

 

 

 

GospelPub-MegaSportsCampBreakingFreeGOSPEL PUBLISHING HOUSE
megasportscamp.com
MEGA Sports Camp: Breaking Free  

Theme: Teaching kids biblical principles and builds character through their favorite sports activities, this church-led program is fully adaptable to suit any church’s size, volunteers and facilities.

 

 

Group-Athens

GROUP PUBLISHING
group.com/athens
Athens: Paul’s Dangerous Journey to Share the Truth 

Theme: Imagine leaving a life of privilege and power to face angry mobs, painful imprisonment and chain-breaking earthquakes—all to spread the life-changing truth of God’s love. Learn the jaw-dropping story of the apostle Paul—straight from Paul himself! 

 

 

 

 

Group-KingdomRockGROUP PUBLISHING
group.com/kingdomrock
Kingdom Rock: Where Kids Stand Strong for God  

Theme: Enter the epic adventure that empowers kids to stand strong. At Kingdom Rock VBS, God’s victorious power isn’t a fairy tale.

 

 

 

LifeWay-BackyardKidsLIFEWAY CHRISTIAN RESOURCES
lifeway.com/vbs
Backyard Kids Club  

Theme: Take VBS outside the church and into your community with Backyard Kids Club

 

 

 

LifeWay-ClubVBSJungleJauntLIFEWAY CHRISTIAN RESOURCES
lifeway.com/clubvbs
Club VBS: Jungle Jaunt  

Theme: Based on Psalm 145:1-2, kids will learn to praise, trust and follow the one true God through the wild. 

 

 

 

LifeWay-ColossalCoasterWorldLIFEWAY CHRISTIAN RESOURCES
lifeway.com/vbs
Colossal Coaster World: Facing Fear, Trusting God  

Theme: Using 2 Timothy 1:7, Colossal Coaster World VBS will challenge kids to face their fears and trust God as they zip along the roller coaster of life. 

 

 

 

 

 

MennoMedia-BreatheItInMENNOMEDIA
mennomedia.org/vbs
Breathe It In: God Gives Life  

Theme: Children are invited to discover the life-giving breath of God. Through Bible stories on breath and wind, children will explore how God’s own breath was used to create people, and how the wind of the Spirit helped the young church grow. 

 

 

 

RegularBaptistPress-InvestigationDestinationREGULAR BAPTIST PRESS
rbpvbs.org
Investigation Destination: Follow Clues to the King of Kings  

Theme: Investigation Destination turns VBS students into secret agents—investigators on a special mission to discover clues about a special person, the King of Kings. The objective: Prepare students for the return of the King, challenging them to believe in Jesus and accept Him as Savior and then to choose to trust, follow, love, obey and serve Him. Those who know the Savior will want to tell others about Jesus, our wonderful King.

 

 

 

StandardPub-GodsBackyardUnderTheStarsSTANDARD PUBLISHING
vacationbibleschool.com
God’s Backyard Bible Camp Under the Stars  

Theme: Get ready for outdoor adventure under the shimmer of starlight that starts in your own backyard and gets bigger each day as kids take the love of Jesus into their homes, neighborhoods and communities.

 

 

 

 

StandardPub-GodsBackyardUnderTheSunSTANDARD PUBLISHING
vacationbibleschool.com
God’s Backyard Bible Camp Under the Sun  

Theme: Get ready for a sunny outdoor adventure that starts in your own backyard and gets bigger each day as kids take the love of Jesus into their homes, neighborhoods and communities.

 

 

 

 

 

UrbanMin-Jesus-FamilyReunionRemixLogoURBAN MINISTRIES, INC.
(UMI)
urbanministriesvbs.com
Jesus Family Reunion: The Remix   

Theme: Encouraging stronger relationships in spiritual and natural families through Jesus Christ. This program introduces family time for all 10 lessons, including We Believe! 
We Encourage! We Forgive! We Protect! and We Give! Each lesson highlights a family from the Bible that dealt with the same struggles as families today.   read more

Little-Girl-Computer-Reaching-Kids

Reaching 21st-Century Kids Takes Jesus-Powered Effort

A time-honored tradition, VBS has changed with the times to bring God’s unchanging Word to a tech-savvy younger generation. We talked to the creators of this summer’s offerings to bring you insights and information for fostering an experience with eternal impact.

Chances are if you’re around a kid growing up in today’s high-tech culture you’re well aware that the younger generation is beyond proficient in technology. Most kids can navigate an iPhone or iPad to find and play their favorite game, log in to a website on a laptop computer, and with a few clicks of a TV remote and Wii controller hit a home run, throw a slider or practice their golf swing—all without adult guidance.

Reaching kids in the 21st century has indeed become a moving target. So as your church starts to think about finding connection points to unchurched families, kids and their changing culture should be of utmost consideration. Fortunately, the publishers of Vacation Bible School (VBS) curricula are giving churches a fighting chance, providing material infused with digital elements that share the unchanging message of the Good News. We talked with five VBS publishers about what churches can expect from this year’s offerings.  read more

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How to Take Mature Disciples to the Next Level

What is it, how is it cultivated and what is the impact? Perimeter Church Pastor Randy Pope shares his church’s journey toward developing mature believers.

If you were asked to name three or four of your church’s best offerings for the spiritual formation of your people, what would they be? If you’re like most leaders, you’d list sermons, seminars, Sunday school classes, small groups. But are those programs really helping people become mature and equipped in Christ? They weren’t at my church. So we went on a discovery process that led us to a startling, yet simple solution. Notice I said simple—not easy!

For most of my 35 years of ministry, I’ve taken an annual study leave to evaluate my life, family and ministry. While I was away one year assessing the ministry of Perimeter Church, I began to realize that while we had been applauded and recognized for doing good things and being successful, in reality we were drawing a target around an arrow once it had been shot. We had been lauded for how far we had been shooting our arrow. But how foolish we had been to celebrate an aimless shot where the target is determined by the shot. read more

f-Murrell-WikkiChurch

Single-Minded for a Single Purpose

Through the years Victory Church has become very clear and very focused on what we are trying to do. Why have we become so fixated on a single strategy? It is, first of all, because we have embraced the Lord’s Great Commission as our own. Making disciples is the driving force behind everything we do. Second, it’s because we have overwhelming confirmation in our own experience that this one move, if mastered, is unstoppable and indefensible. I believe all churches and ministries can grow if only they master a discipleship process that is simple, biblical and transferable. I know of churches that are missing many seemingly important things such as nice buildings, good music equipment, support staff, big givers and dynamic preachers. Yet they’re still growing because they are making disciples.

Churches can be blessed with all those seemingly important things and become completely consumed with activities that have nothing to do with making disciples. Our goal is to make our small groups and everything else we do support our discipleship process. 

Unfortunately, crowded church calendars often compete with discipleship. No activity is neutral. We recognize that everything we do and say will either underline or undermine our discipleship process. 

—From WikiChurch: Making Discipleship Engaging, Empowering & Viral by Steve Murrell read more

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Are You a Wikipedia or Nupedia Leader?

When a church operates with an “everyone’s a minister” mindset, combined with a defined leadership multiplication process, the potential for kingdom impact is infinite

I am an American, but most of my adult life has been spent in Manila, Philippines, as a cross-cultural pastor and church planter. My wife, Deborah, and I originally went to Manila on a one-month summer mission trip to establish a church that would reach Filipino university students. That one month has lasted almost three decades, and that student church we established now conducts 92 weekly worship services in 16 Manila locations. It’s also planted churches in 60 Philippine cities and has sent Filipino missionaries to plant churches in more than a dozen nations.

Because our church constantly plants new churches and sends cross-cultural missionaries, it seems we’re always in the process of training new pastors, new worship leaders, new kids’ pastors and other new leaders to replace those we send. Because of this constant need for leaders, we’ve had to develop a culture and process for leadership multiplication.

Here’s an example of what we’ve done: Joseph was a talented singer and musician, but his first few times on stage leading worship were less than spectacular. After a staff meeting (that did not include Joseph), the head of our worship department suggested we switch worship leaders for the following week because we had a big-shot foreign guest speaker scheduled. He reminded me that the last time Joseph led worship, it was “forgettable.”

My response: I said that I was well aware we were hosting the big-shot American and that Joseph was not our best. However, I didn’t see any reason to bench Joseph. I reminded our entire staff that we weren’t trying to impress our guest speaker. In fact, he had better impress us or he wouldn’t be invited back.

For me, it’s more important to equip a worship leader than to have a perfect worship service. I knew that if we rescheduled Joseph, it would shatter his confidence and set the equipping process back a few months. When Sunday came around, Joseph led worship and our big-shot foreign guest preached. Sure, the worship was less than average, but Joseph went on to become a good worship leader and later a great pastor and church planter. He and his wife are now pioneering an underground church network in a restricted nation. Being an upstart worship leader was an integral part of his equipping process. I’m not sure he would be where he is today if we had short-circuited the equipping process to impress our guest speaker.

We hear the phrase all the time, “Every member a minister.” Yet because of our performance-driven culture, we often have little tolerance for the messiness of the equipping process that empowers average members to minister. 

We do church as if only professional ministers should do ministry. But Scripture offers a different perspective. The biblical job description for professional ministers—apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors and teachers—is to equip the “nonprofessionals” for ministry, then get out of their way and allow God to move through them. When we forget that job description, we forget one of the primary reasons God called us in the first place.

As full-time pastors, it’s common for us to measure the effectiveness of our week by how busy we are with random acts of ministry. On Monday we saved a marriage, on Tuesday we prayed for Fred in the hospital, on Wednesday we taught lesson 26 of our 48-part Ezekiel series, on Thursday we preached to our mailman and on Friday we said a prayer at the high school football game. All that’s great, but in the process, did we equip anyone else to do ministry? Usually not. 

It’s common for pastors to have a week packed with ministry activities and yet still be delinquent in our ministerial responsibilities. It’s because we’re not only called to do ministry, but also to equip others to do ministry.

I often ask pastors two questions: Do you spend more time ministering to people or equipping people to minister? Do you spend more time preparing sermons to preach, or preparing people to minister? Unfortunately, most full-time ministers I know spend far more time preparing sermons, leading meetings and running religious organizations than actually equipping regular people to do ministry.

Once we accept that we’re called not just to do ministry, but also to equip others to do ministry, the next question is: How? Out of the desperation of our endless need for leaders in the Philippines, we developed a simple, four-part leadership development process.

1) IDENTIFICATION. The starting point for equipping spiritual leaders is to help people identify their unique and divine calling. A calling is from God. Everyone has one. Far too many people have no clue what they’re called to do. 

Leaders help people identify their calling by helping them recognize and develop their God-given strengths and gifts. Leaders also help by recognizing hidden potential in others. 

I never would have started teaching the Bible 32 years ago unless my pastor had first identified a potential gift God might have given me. Then he led me (and often pushed or dragged me) through open doors, even if the opening was barely a crack. I’m thankful for people who saw gifts and strengths in me that I never noticed because of my condemnation, ignorance and immaturity.

2) INSTRUCTION. Paul’s letters are filled with doctrinal, relational and practical instruction. Many times he sent instructional letters to churches in cities he had never visited, demonstrating that effective instruction does not depend on personal relationship or physical proximity. 

My life has been positively impacted by instruction through books and podcasts written and spoken by people I have never met. Two seminary courses, Ethnohermeneutics by Larry Caldwell and The Book of Genesis by Dr. Nomer Bernardino, impact almost every sermon I have preached nearly 20 years after sitting in those classes. I could list many individual books or sermons that have redirected my life, enlightened my mind or softened my heart in life-changing ways.

3) IMPARTATION. As important as instruction is, it’s not enough. Paul wrote to the Romans, “I long to see you so that I may impart to you some spiritual gift to make you strong” (Rom. 1:11, NIV, emphasis added). Paul sent instruction to people he had never met, but he seemed to need a face-to-face relationship for impartation to happen. 

I can read all about evangelism, but something happens when I actually hang around my friends who are evangelists. I get an evangelistic impartation that changes me for the better in ways that instruction alone can’t.

Impartation happened when King Saul was hanging around the prophets, then started prophesying (see 1 Sam. 19). Impartation happened when God took the Spirit that was on Moses and put it on the 70 elders (see Num. 11). 

I’m not sure that the same level of impartation happens through email messages or online classes. There’s something about face-to-face ministry that God has designed to be part of the equipping process.

4) INTERNSHIP. Elijah and Elisha, David and Solomon, Barnabas and Paul, and Paul and Timothy are only a few of the biblical examples of internship. Internship is basically on-the-job training. Internships can be either formal or informal. Over the years, I’ve had formal interns who requested a mentoring relationship, and I’ve had informal “interns” who had no idea I was intentionally equipping them for ministry. They thought we were just hanging out together. Whether formal or informal, internship is a vital part of the equipping process.

In closing, let me explain the power of equipping every believer to do ministry with a real-world illustration. In 2000, Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger started an online encyclopedia called “Nupedia.” Their goal was to include articles written only by credentialed experts. Before an article could be posted to Nupedia, it had to go through an extensive, seven-step, scholarly review process, which proved to be painstakingly slow. When Nupedia finally unplugged its servers in 2003, only 24 articles had been posted, and 74 were stuck in the review process. There weren’t many articles, but they were professionally written.

In 2001, one year after Nupedia launched, Wales and Sanger also started a feeder system called “Wikipedia.” They got the name from the shuttle bus at Hawaii International Airport called WikiWiki Transport. Wiki is a Hawaiian word meaning “quick.” The Wikipedia idea was to allow nonprofessionals, non-scholars and non-experts to write articles that the Nupedia scholars would then review. If the Wikipedia articles survived the seven-step Nupedia approval process, they would be posted. If not, they would be trashed. 

By the end of 2001, volunteers had submitted more than 20,000 “wiki” articles. It took the trained expert scholars three years to create 24 articles and the volunteers one year to create 20,000. Wikipedia now contains more than 18 million articles written, edited and posted by volunteers.

Unfortunately, many churches and ministries today function more like Nupedia than Wikipedia. They allow only credentialed, ordained professionals to minister while volunteers are expected to show up and pay up, but not to engage in serious ministry.

Imagine if the situation were reversed. Imagine if every believer, not just paid leaders, actively engaged in ministry. That’s what I call a “WikiChurch.” That’s what happened in the book of Acts. 

Wikipedia may be an imperfect source, but it has made information widely available by simply empowering volunteers. That’s what church leaders are called to do—to equip and empower imperfect people to honor God and make disciples.


Steve Murrell is the founding pastor of Victory in Manila, the president of Every Nation Churches and Ministries, and the author of WikiChurch, from which this article is adapted with permission. He and his wife, Deborah, have three adult sons and split their time between Manila and Nashville, Tenn. read more

f-Evrist-Foundations IstockphotoP Wei

Foundations for Rock-Solid Lives

Seven strength-builders can equip believers to withstand life’s stressors and storms

When I was a boy I lived in a community where a tract of affordable houses had been built. From the outside they looked simple, yet attractive. By all appearances it seemed that these families were living the American Dream of home ownership. But this dream eventually became a nightmare.

You see, there was a problem. The foundations these homes were built on were compromised. They simply weren’t strong enough to deal with the stress placed on them. Over time the effects of shifting soil and changing temperatures took their toll and these foundations began to crack. As they cracked, these houses began to come apart. Ceilings separated, cabinets began to pull away from the walls, floors buckled. 

Even though most of these homes were nicely appointed, inside and out, none of that could mask the fact that these homes were built on faulty foundations. Any structure is only as strong as what it is built on. read more

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About Our Guest Editor...

Joey Bonifacio is the senior pastor of Victory Fort, one of 15 congregations that make up Victory Church in the metro Manila area of the Philippines. Each weekend, Victory hosts 94 gatherings with 51 lead pastors preaching to a multigenerational congregation of almost 65,000. Though the church’s membership has grown almost 25 percent each year for the last 12 years, of greater concern to Victory’s leadership team are the number of baptisms (4,613 in 2011) and discipleship groups (currently more than 5,000).

After running a successful business for years—and then splitting time between his company and ministry—Bonifacio joined the Victory team as a full-time pastor in 1998. Today he is a member of the International Apostolic Team of Every Nation Ministries and a member of the board of directors of the Real Life Foundation. He and his wife, Marie, have three sons. 

f-Bonaficio-ACulture-TheLegoPrincipleBonifacio is also the author of The LEGO Principle, which draws parallels between the famous toy-maker and core discipleship elements. Jesus said the two greatest commandments are to love God and to love your neighbor. Just as a Lego piece was designed to do one thing—connect, regardless of shape, size or color—we were made to connect with God and others, Bonifacio says. “If you can connect to the top with God and to the bottom with others, you can pretty much shape the world you live in.” read more

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