Columns

Yesterday's Leader

Beware the habits of moral compromise that steal the approval of God—and the credibility of men and women.

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Teach the Second Coming

My time with Oral Roberts reminded me of a preaching topic I've been sadly neglecting: the return of Christ.

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Denominations: Alive and Well

It's time we stopped believing the exaggerated predictions of the death of denominations.

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The Unusual Suspects

True apostleship is not a matter of aspiration but of obedience.

Who in the world would ever want to be an apostle? Lest we think it an avenue of worldly advancement, let's ponder the plight foretold by Jesus for apostles: at best, persecution; at worst, death (see Luke 11:49; Matt. 10:17).

Lest we think it a role reserved for the intellectually or spiritually superior, let's recall how Matthew was chosen: with a pair of dice (see Acts 1:26).

Lest we think it a path to the finer things in life, let's remember Paul's station: "hungry ... thirsty ... in rags ... homeless ..." (1 Cor 4:11, NIV).

No, apostleship is not a matter of aspiration but of obedience. It's a divine call that often comes unexpectedly upon those whom God chooses--not necessarily those who would appear to have all the talent, charisma and spiritual power needed to fill the shoes of an apostle.

Sure, apostles are those who have made themselves available for the purposes of God, and they are often gifted with passion and skills fitting their callings. But most ultimately find themselves dumbfounded by the ways in which He ends up using them in His kingdom.

I must confess that I've been dubious about the existence of modern-day apostles. Like C. Peter Wagner, I'm no fan of the self-appointed ones. And I'm not sure whether I like using the title as a form of address. (As a second-generation Pentecostal, "brother" or "sister" works just fine for me.)

But my skeptical leanings were cured by talking to Samuel Lee and Kayy Gordon and reading about Zhang Rongliang in preparation for "Apostles Among Us".

Each of these are consumed with the desire to see others pick up the baton of ministry and go further than they have. And they are too busy equipping pastors and strategizing how to reach nations to worry about titles.

The "apostle debate" is not over yet: Will denominations seek to encourage apostolic church-planting and mentorship models that are bearing so much fruit in the non-Western world?

Will apostolic networks address the concerns of accountability and sound theology--all while warding off the trend toward institutionalism that threatens historic denominations?

Both must avoid the triumphalistic notion that God works through only one type of church structure and accept the fact that ecclesiastical governments are only temporary. They exist for the sake of the church's function, which is to equip the saints--until Jesus returns.

As you read this issue of Ministries Today, I hope you'll find--like I did--that wherever God is building His church, apostles are laying the foundation.

The titles they wear may differ with the expressions of time and culture, but their function is the same: plant congregations, equip leaders, confront demonic powers and marshal resources for kingdom purposes.

Even the crustiest of skeptics would agree.


Matthew Green is managing editor of Ministries Today. He invites your comments and questions at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

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The Apostolic 'Right Stuff'

Character and servanthood--not accomplishments--are the primary marks of authentic apostles.

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Can You Hear Me Now?

Prophecy is God's way of giving us a second chance to listen and obey.

Prophets bug me. I think they're supposed to. I'm not usually patient enough to pursue what Mike Bickle calls the "horrible" task of discernment. Like an irritable judge, I prefer to bang my gavel and pronounce bogus any prophecy I can't get my arms around.

The funny thing is, I have no aversion to digging out a commentary and poring over a lexicon to determine what Ezekiel and Zechariah were saying in their sometimes-enigmatic prophecies.

Now, I would never suggest that the words of modern-day prophets should be handled with the same reverence as the oracles of biblical prophets that have found a place in the canon.

But, any time God speaks--or we think He may be speaking--we should listen up, discern and apply what we hear ... whether He chooses to speak through the pages of Scripture, the lips of a prophet or the mouth of an ornery donkey.

Why? Because when the God of the universe speaks to His creation through prophecy, it is an act of great mercy--especially since He has already spoken in Scripture.

Some may say that God has said all He ever needed to say in His written Word. They're right. But more than bringing new revelation, prophecy is often most valuable when it reminds God's people of what He has already said. Consider the warnings and judgments of the major and minor prophets, which ultimately have their foundation in the covenant stipulations of Deuteronomy.

The two most prolific authors of Scripture, Moses and Paul, both lamented not the abundance of prophecy but its dearth.

Several Israelites came to Moses complaining about the spontaneous outbursts of unexpected prophets Eldad and Medad, and Moses replied, "'I wish that all the Lord's people were prophets and that the Lord would put his Spirit on them!'" (Num. 11:29, NIV).

Paul echoed Moses' sentiments when he said, "I would like every one of you to speak in tongues, but I would rather have you prophesy" (1 Cor. 14:5).

This enthusiasm for the prophetic was not born out of inexperience. Both Moses and Paul were aware of the controversy that prophecy would bring the people of God. But they were more concerned about the spiritual famine Amos speaks of--"a famine of hearing the words of the Lord" (see Amos 8:11).

Sure, God doesn't have to send us prophets, but isn't it just like Him to give us a second chance to listen and obey?

As you read this issue of Ministries Today, I pray that you'll be challenged to embrace prophetic ministry. Fraudulent prophets will always be with us, as will sneaky evangelists, abusive pastors, heretical teachers and power-hungry apostles.

But, if we allow our fear of the counterfeit to shake our faith in the authentic, we may miss out on hearing God speak.


Matthew Green is managing editor of Ministries Today. He invites your comments and questions at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

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