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Does God Care About Organization?





Are organization and structure important to you?
Are organization and structure important to you? (Lightstock)

My top two spiritual gifts are leadership and administration, so the subject of organization is something I love and gravitate toward. If you have the spiritual gift of administration, you love structure, systems, processes and org charts. If you don't, those things probably drive you crazy.

Regardless of your primary gifting, it helps to approach leadership with a 30,000-foot view and try to see the big picture of what's going on in your organization. The way the body of Christ works is if this is difficult for you, surround yourself with other leaders for whom this is natural.

In my travels, speaking, consulting and conversations with leaders of all types, I've discovered a major reason they are not getting the results they desire is due to a system designed to give them the exact result they're getting. If your system is designed to fail, you will fail every time. If your organization's culture is one of creativity, innovation and trust, and you have a healthy system in place, there is no limit to what you as a team can accomplish (through the Holy Spirit).

Do you think the Bible cares about organization? I do. Read the story of Moses and his father-in-law in Exodus 18:13-26.

I thank God for including the story of Moses and his father-in-law, Jethro. In this story, we see Moses was a man with flaws and had made a poor decision on how to best go about judging the people. Maybe he didn't have the gift of leadership or administration. He did, however, have the wisdom to listen to someone who did, and the Bible tells us this gave Moses new strength to carry out whatever God commanded him. The people also flourished in their settings. It was a win-win.

The book The Externally Focused Quest by Eric Swanson and Rick Rusaw has some great thoughts on this as well. I could easily quote chapters of it for you, but I'll just encourage you to read it.

It's crucial to recognize your system could be choking the life, health, creativity and innovation out of your organization. My encouragement to you is to have someone with the gift of administration evaluate your systems. This could be someone in your church (maybe a business leader who will volunteer), a gifted staff member, or an outside consultant who can come in and look at the big picture.

One scripture I've found myself quoting to church leaders often is when Jesus told his disciples to be "wise as serpents" (Matt. 10:16). In The Message, verse 16 reads, "be as cunning as a snake." I am often referring to this verse when I'm engaged in helping an organization with strategic planning and overall strategy.

I don't think there's anything wrong with strategy when it comes to church leadership. Of course we need to always be sensitive and open to the Spirit's leading and sudden change, but God can be with us in the strategy and planning of any organization. So as you set up your systems, structure and processes, I would suggest two thoughts: keep it simple, and keep it fluid or flexible.

Neil Cole, director of Church Multiplication Associates said, "Simplicity is the key to the fulfillment of the Great Commission in this generation. If the process is complex, it will break down early in the transference to the next generation of disciples. The more complex the process, the greater the giftedness that is needed to keep it going. The simpler the process, the more available it is to the broader Christian population" (Cultivating a Life for God, page 10).

Albert Einstein said, "Out of complexity, find simplicity." I agree. You might have 75 staff members on your team, but this doesn't mean you can't approach your structure and processes in such a way in which they are simple to share, quote and move people through. Did you know research strongly backs this principle?

The book Simple Church is full of thoroughly researched and proven principles. I want to strongly encourage you to read it if you haven't already. In Simple Church, the authors, Thom Rainer and Eric Geiger, tell us that, "In general, simple churches are growing and vibrant. Churches with a simple process for reaching and maturing people are expanding the kingdom. Conversely, complex churches are struggling and anemic. Churches without a process or with a complicated process for making disciples are floundering. As a whole, cluttered and complex churches are not alive. Our research shows that these churches are not growing" (Simple Church, page 14).

The preceding is a brief excerpt from one chapter of Greg Atkinson's new book Strange Leadership: 40 Ways to Lead an Innovative Organization. Go to the book's website for more information.

Greg Atkinson is an author, speaker, consultant and the editor of Christian Media Magazine. Greg has started businesses including the worship resource website WorshipHouse Media, a social media marketing company and his own consulting firm.

For the original article, visit gregatkinson.com.

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