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Radical Missions

f-Meyer-Radical-Missions JMM-David-DobsonHow outreach ministry Hand of Hope partners and risks to reach the unreached

For as long as I can remember, my mom and dad (Joyce and Dave Meyer) have always looked for ways to help those in need. I’ve watched them cry with compassion for the homeless, hungry and mistreated—and then do something about it.

From the very beginning, using our resources to reach out to others has been extremely important to them. Our commitment initially started as a tithe—allocating 10 percent of our income to help the hurting through missions efforts. Over the years, that percentage has increased incrementally.

As CEO of Hand of Hope (the missions arm for Joyce Meyer Ministries), helping others is my calling. It’s what God created me to do. But witnessing my parents’ love for hurting people has influenced the course of my life. Through the years, their lifestyle of radical generosity has transformed the hearts of millions—including mineand set the groundwork for everything we do through Hand of Hope.

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Do Something

f-Meyer-DoSomething JMM-David-DobsonThe power of making God’s Word and love radically known

Some people you meet change your life forever.

When I met Abeba, a beautiful, sweet and special little girl in one of our Joyce Meyer Ministries feeding programs in Ethiopia, she was severely malnourished. Her little body was swollen, already in the shut-down mode of starvation. Many in her village were starving, but she was one of the worst cases.

The thing that blew me away about Abeba was her joy. Despite how much pain she was in from malnutrition and her living conditions, Abeba’s smile always glowed.

I had the opportunity to give food to Abeba’s mother for Abeba and her nine brothers and sisters. They were visibly happy and thankful just to have something to eat. Often, the food our ministry provides in this region is the difference between life and death for many of these children and families. Abeba now had a new shot at life.

Our team had the privilege of spending quite a bit of time with her. A year later as we prepared for a return trip to Ethiopia, I was excited to see Abeba. Sadly, just before we left for the trip, we learned she had passed away.

At first I was shocked. Then I bawled for a while. I just couldn’t believe this had happened.

On the plane back to Ethiopia, I felt empty and hopeless: If we are going to help these kids and they’re not going to make it, what’s the point?

Then while we were there I saw Abeba’s mom with one of Abeba’s little sisters, and it hit me: There’s more to do. There are more people to help. Yes, there will be kids who don’t make it, but there are a lot more who need our help. And we can help. So we can’t give up.

We were able to give Abeba a year free of hunger and full of love. Her life greatly affected me. God used her to teach me about my purpose. When I wake up now, what I care about and focus on is different. Abeba inspired me to change and do more. I am humbled to have been a part of her life.

I believe God allows important connections like these so that we can come back and tell their story, encouraging others to find their own purpose and do something to make a difference in our world.

As Much As You Can, Wherever You Can

My passion is seeing people’s lives changed through the message of Jesus Christ, as our ministry shows them His love. Whether we’re reaching out through my mom’s teaching or the missions outreaches we’re involved in, it’s all about real, relevant, intentional ministry. We share the gospel and relieve human suffering in any way we can, wherever we can.

Through our missions arm, Hand of Hope, we are privileged to be part of thousands of outreaches resulting in people being loved, fed, medically treated, rescued from slavery, restored from disasters, etc.

A few years ago, after an amazing night of outreach in Los Angeles where more than 2,000 people gave their lives to Jesus, something struck me: Because God is working through our ministry, a great magnitude of His work is happening all at the same time, all around the world. As a result of people coming together in a joint effort, the impossible is truly becoming possible.

I sat and thought about all that was happening at the same time those 2,000 people gave their lives to Jesus:
  • While we were in Los Angeles, my brother, David, was across the world in Cambodia with a team of people kicking off one of our ministry’s largest-ever mission outreaches.
  • At the same time, the gospel was being preached on hundreds of TV and radio stations through our daily programs—reaching a potential audience of two-thirds of the world. And at the same time, there were also hungry kids being fed through our feeding programs—kids that would have otherwise starved to death.
  • Across Asia, people were caring for orphans in our children’s homes. And while that was happening, postal workers were delivering life-changing resources to help families grow in their walk with God.
  • Disaster relief teams we had sponsored were finishing another long day of relief and rebuilding work, and thousands of men, women and children were waking up in newly constructed villages and homes that we helped rebuild in parts of India and Sri Lanka after the tsunami. The list kept going.
Together, we are showing the love of Jesus as much as we can, wherever we can. The really amazing thing is that these kinds of outreaches are not just happening for one day—but rather every day! God’s grace and all of us doing our part make this possible. Every member of the team is an important piece of the big picture.

Our mission is to make God’s Word accessible to as many people as possible. We know that His Word is always current. So our job is to keep ourselves current so that we can catch the attention of the people He wants to reach. That’s why we use media outlets like our website, TV and radio programs, Facebook, Twitter and mobile apps that offer daily devotionals and access to our Enjoying Everyday Life broadcast.

I am humbled by all God is doing through us and honored to be part of such a great team of people. It’s pretty amazing what He is allowing us to accomplish together around the world—mind-blowing, really! All glory and honor to Him.

Our Partners Play a Huge Part

When I talk about our team, I’m not just referring to our employees. Everyone—our employees, our friends, our partners—they are all irreplaceable. Their ongoing prayer and support allow us to reach so many in the United States and throughout the world.

Words can’t describe how grateful we are to our partners. Our family regularly prays for them, and several teams in our office pray daily for them and their prayer requests. Their faithful generosity is literally helping change lives across the globe, and we can’t thank them enough!

In addition to individual partners, we also have organization partners—great relationships with dozens of groups like Convoy of Hope, Service International, Mercy Ministries and Crisis Aid, to name a few. We think of these ministries as God’s hands and feet, reaching out to help hurting people and fulfill the Great Commission, often in very remote, unreached places.

In the words of my brother, David, “Together, we are better!” God is using our unique differences and talents to make an even bigger impact than we ever could alone. If you have partnered with us in any way, I want to say, “Thank you, thank you, thank you!” You are helping to rewrite people’s stories.

I think of a young boy named Les in our orphanage in Cambodia. Les and I became good buddies. His father was killed in a fishing accident while working, and his mother could not afford to keep him and his five siblings alive.

Without a ministry like this orphanage, Les would likely grow up on the streets. His story has been rewritten. Les is growing up fed, clothed and educated. He has a roof over his head, a new family that gives him much love and attention, and most important, he’s learning about Jesus!

Les is just one of the thousands of lives that together we are changing. Seeing the difference in his life motivates me to do more.

We Can All Do Something

More than anything, I want people and churches to know that we can all do more. Like my mom says in her book, Change Your World, we firmly believe that every church or ministry and every Christian should be involved in world missions, helping the poor and needy. It’s a vital part of being a follower of Jesus.

When we do more, more people will be affected, more people will be helped, more people will experience the love of Jesus. And I firmly believe that God’s commands to help and serve others changes not only the lives of the people we touch, but we are changed in the process as well.

If you lead a church with limited resources, know this: Small things do make a difference. Some people and churches might have resources to do big things while others can’t. That’s OK. Just do something with what you have—whether it’s mowing an elderly neighbor’s lawn or leading a missions trip that awakens your congregation to others’ needs.

Look at the lives of the people that have impacted you. Assess the relationships you have and the opportunities to partner with others to make a greater impact. Consider the resources in your hands and within your reach. Then do something to show the love of Jesus.
Daniel Meyer is CEO of U.S. Media and Operations for Joyce Meyer Ministries and co-creator of Fuzed Worship, an outreach of JMM. Driven by a passion to see lives changed, he is committed to positioning JMM for the next generation and beyond, and effectively communicating the irreplaceable role of its partners.

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Because He First Rescued Us

f-Caine-BecauseHeWhy grasping God’s sacrifice compels a radical response      to injustice

I bolted upright in bed, tears stinging my eyes and sweat drenching my hair. The shrill screams for help still rang in my ears. Instinctively, I cried out, “We’re coming for you!” But there was no response, only silence. These girls were in my dreams now.

Anyone who’s a first responder will tell you they encounter things they can never “un-see.” First responders—paramedics, firefighters, law enforcement and medics—observe human suffering up close, sometimes too close. When instinct says to look away, these heroes zoom in on the pain. Years later, many can still see the faces and hear the screams. Tragedy and injustice are not easily forgotten.

Over the past four years, my husband, Nick, and I have learned that firsthand. After seeing “tragedy” I couldn’t ignore any longer, Nick and I became first responders, founding The A21 Campaign in 2008 to help fight human trafficking in Eastern Europe. Until then, like most people, we had kept a safe distance—unsettled by the idea of modern-day slavery, but not yet upended. 

With little knowledge and a lot of passion, we began to zoom in on the pain and quickly learned that sex trafficking is a $32 billion-a-year industry and the world’s fastest-growing organized crime today, second only to drug trafficking.  

What we saw was astonishing. I couldn’t get away from it, not even when I slept. I still can’t.

When you meet a young girl who was burned and whipped by her captors, you don’t forget that. When a hollow-eyed survivor asks softly, “Why didn’t you come sooner?” you don’t forget that. When a woman is so traumatized from abuse that she can no longer speak, you don’t forget that. 

Like I said, some things you can never un-see.

A Holy    Resistance

These images—these people—are a part of me now. They remind me that atrocities aren’t confined to history books; they slip off the pages and crawl into our local communities. If no one stands against them, they will rehearse their evil practices of the past. 

There must be a holy resistance. I believe that resistance is the church.

Today, more than ever, I’ve come to realize that the battle against injustice is not a calm fight. Evil is not solved; it must be overwhelmed.

That means we, as the church, must embrace a level of radical behavior that makes many people in the church uncomfortable. But when I read the Gospels and the stories of how Jesus identified and fought evil, I can’t help but think, Isn’t “radical” what we were originally called to be? Isn’t that how the church was founded—with radical Christians who had walked with Jesus, watching Him breathe life into the dead, refute the Pharisees and ultimately give His life? 

They heard firsthand Christ’s command to “go and make disciples of all nations.” The early church defied tyrants, demolished prejudices, overran obstacles and outlasted persecution.

When I read the stories in Scripture, I’m overwhelmed with evidence that the church was never intended to be a safe place, but rather a saving place. As He prepared the disciples for ministry—those who would build His church—Jesus told them, “Greater is He that is in you, than he that is in the world” (1 John 4:4, KJV).

The early church of the book of Acts was a constant center of activity—a movement, not a museum. The church was created to be active and alive. When the church is working like Christ mandated, it is as much a verb as it is a noun—loving, moving, building, comforting, charging, rescuing.

A Kingdom Fight

Our work to abolish human trafficking is a simple exercise in this radical behavior. We are the arms of the church. One arm fights violently against the devil, while the other arm extends healing to those the devil has tried to destroy.

And we’re not doing it alone. The church is rising up and fulfilling its call. Every shelter that has been built and every girl that has been rescued are direct results of the generosity of the saints of God and the local church. 

Radical generosity is making a radical difference in Eastern Europe. We’re seeing it firsthand.

It’s astounding to think of what God has done over the last four years. Together with ministries such as Joyce Meyer Ministries’ Hand of Hope, we are rescuing women from some of the worst environments imaginable. 

With shelters in Greece, Ukraine and Bulgaria, we are infiltrating the very heart of darkness and exposing the enemy’s evil. I call these shelters the point of the sword, fighting human trafficking on its own turf—prying victims from their tormentors’ grip.

However, we know the battle against human trafficking won’t be won through rescues. We need a long-term, sustainable solution. 

That’s why in addition to building shelters, we’re raising awareness of the global sex trade, offering employment to those at risk, educating “clients” to the realities of what they are engaging in and offering transition programs so that no victim ever finds herself in that place again. We are in the schools, on the streets, working with the governments and constantly in prayer. 

Yet the strongest anointing isn’t in the fighting, but rather the extension of a radical, generous love to girls who had given up hope that such a thing could exist.

A Rescue Story

As I think about all of this, I’m reminded that God was the first on-scene responder. He saw us in our brokenness, He ran to our rescue, He simply couldn’t un-see our pain. We were forever on His mind. Throughout the Old Testament He called out, “I’m coming for you.”

The Bible is a rescue story. Before there was racial oppression or human trafficking, we were slaves to our own sin. We were beaten and battered, assailed and assaulted. But God saw us in our lowly state, and in His radical generosity sent a one-man rescue team to become a holy atonement for our sins, forever closing the gap between Him and us.

This example—our own rescue—inspires us to do the same for others. Whether you’re reaching out to underprivileged kids in the inner city, helping care for single mothers in your community, stocking the local food pantry or staring down human traffickers, it is all a response to the rescue you have already received.

I think about 1 John 4:19: “We love because He first loved us” (NIV). That Scripture could just as easily read: “We rescue because He first rescued us.” This is the beauty of the church. Redeemed people, rescued people, sharing redemption with others.

I so love what my friend and mentor Joyce Meyer says about living out your faith. I can still hear her saying with her trademark passion and conviction, “You have to start somewhere. Just go do something for God!” Time and again, she has shown me that faith is more than a concept. Faith must be lived out loud. We can’t just talk about standing against injustice; we must do something about it.

The Great Opportunity

I have great hope for A21 and the church at large. I believe that God is raising up a generation of men and women who are passionate about living out their faith with a generosity that can change our culture and illuminate the darkest places. 

I believe an awakening is taking place. I see leaders who are running to the battle rather than sitting on the sidelines and watching things become progressively worse. On every continent of the globe, families are standing against injustice, cruelty and oppression.

But to be a leader during this time in history isn’t for the weak of heart. Binding up the brokenhearted and preaching freedom for the captive are as real for us as they were for Jesus 2,000 years ago. 

This isn’t a part-time endeavor, and it can’t be done from a distance. It requires on-site response. You have to zoom in on the pain.

For A21, this means finding real girls experiencing real pain in a really broken world. They aren’t someone else’s problem. They are our pursuit.

I always ask people who say they want to make a difference in the world around them today: “What is your pursuit?” When you understand that you have the great opportunity to live a life demonstrating the radical generosity of God’s love, it’s one of the most incredible and life-altering things you can experience.

And in the moments when you feel overwhelmed, or can’t sleep because of the call in front of you—when the names and the faces and the cries stay with you—don’t despair. Take heart. You’re in good company. Jesus understands your call. He feels your burden. He lies awake with you. Jesus is your rescuer, too.
Christine Caine travels the globe taking her messages of hope and inspiration to people around the world. She is a member of the leadership team at Hillsong Church (based in Sydney, Australia), and founder of The A21 Campaign. Caine lives with her husband, Nick, and their two daughters in Southern California.

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The Holy Spirit or Nothing

f-Tyalor-Holy Spirit Tye & Emily Photography
How the indispensable command to preach the third person of the Trinity empowers and breathes life into our churches
and world

O Spirit of the living God, Thou light and fire divine,
Descend upon Thy church once more, and make it truly Thine.
Fill it with love and joy and power, with righteousness and peace;
Till Christ shall dwell in human hearts, and sin and sorrows cease.
Teach us to utter living words of truth which all may hear,
The language all may understand when love speaks loud and clear;
Till every age and race and clime shall blend their creeds in one,
And earth shall form one family by whom Thy will is done.
         —A traditional Welsh hymn by Henry H. Tweedy

More than 50 years of ministry have produced several personal convictions expressed in this hymn and evidenced in Scripture. I want to be frank with you—especially those called to preach the gospel to the church: It is the Holy Spirit or nothing. No salvation; no holiness; no discernment; no power; no prayer; no miracles; no God.

If we are going to preach the gospel, honoring the third person of the Trinity is both necessary and inevitable. He is not just a phantom or an associate God—He is God here, God now, God where it counts. No one is saved without His work of conviction and conversion. No one develops holiness of heart without the Holy Spirit's continuing work. No one is empowered for witness and service apart from Him.

And while more than 150 specific works of the Holy Spirit are mentioned in the New Testament, let's not forget that without the Spirit there would be no Bible—Old Testament or New Testament. R.T. Kendall declares that the Holy Spirit's greatest work is the Bible itself, having inspired those who wrote it.

Second Peter 1:20-21 reminds us: "Above all you must understand that no prophecy of Scripture came about by the prophet's own interpretation. For prophecy never had its origin in the will of man, but men spoke from God the message that came from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit" (NIV).

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Big 'H' or Little 'h'

f-Dilena-BigH ? Istockphoto-XebecheStruggling with your next sermon? Make the intentional decision to listen for the heartbeat of Jesus.

We all have those times in ministry when it's just plain difficult. In the early days of my ministry and preaching, Saturdays and Mondays were those times for me.
Saturdays were spent struggling to find a verse, an illustration, a thought to share with the people that would show up at church the next morning to see and feel all my hard work. These were "pre-Internet" days, so by mid-morning I'd have 25 books spread out all over my floor just to find one nugget of truth.
The second-worst days were Mondays. After I had the time to let the damage I caused the day before sink in, Monday became a depressing day of "no one was changed, saved or transformed and even cared." And then realization set in that I got to do this again for the midweek service.
There has to be a better way, I thought. Over the years, I found one.
It all depended on what my "H" looked like.

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Power from on High

f-Carrin-Power ? Istockphoto-Irochka TA FORMER NONBELIEVER IN THE BAPTISM AND GIFTS OF THE HOLY SPIRIT SHARES WHY THE ANOINTING OF GOD IS THE INDISPENSABLE COMPONENT FOR PREACHING POWER PREACHING

In His first sermon, Jesus told the people of Nazareth, "The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me, because He has anointed Me to preach the gospel" (Luke 4:18). As with Jesus, so with us: There can be no authentic preaching of the gospel without the anointing of the Holy Spirit.
My 60-plus years of ministry can be divided into two parts. For the first 27 years of pastoral work, I was a hard-line nonbeliever in the baptism and gifts of the Holy Spirit. My denomination insisted that miraculous works of the Spirit vanished when the Apostle John died, and I wrongly carried that error to my congregation.

A Hard Road to Spiritual Awakening
During that period I never saw an alcoholic, drug addict, suicidal person or someone suffering from similar problems miraculously deliv-ered by the power of God—nor did I expect it. It's difficult to think about and admit, but my ignorance of Scripture was extremely costly to me and my flock.
I'll never forget one particularly dark time. A young mother in our congregation, whom we all thought gentle and kind, loaded a gun, murdered her husband and three children, and committed suicide. At the time it was Atlanta's worst-ever murder-suicide. It's impossible to describe the horrific effect the tragedy had on a network of families, friends, neighbors and our church.

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