Ministry Today – Serving and empowering church leaders

A Call to the Church For Social Transformation

Bishop Harry R. Jackson Jr. is on a mission to protect the moral compass of the nation by educating and empowering churches, as well as community and political leaders


It’s the political season in what many are saying is the most important presidential election of our lifetime, so I turned to my good friend, Bishop Harry R. Jackson Jr., because he not only has motivated Christians to get involved in the political process to bring change, but he’s highly respected.

Our guest editor has appeared on the CBS Evening News, Fox News’ Special ReportThe O’Reilly Factor and The Tavis Smiley Show. Bishop Jackson’s articles have been featured in The Wall Street Journal, the New York TimesThe Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times.

And why not? He’s Harvard educated and very articulate—something the mainstream media respects. But at the same time Bishop Jackson is a great spokesman from a Christian perspective—he understands the believer’s mandate to bring God’s kingdom to earth. Bishop Jackson has a successful track record of growing churches and discipling believers. He hasn’t strayed into liberal theology, and his integrity is above reproach. read more

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Turning The Tide

What you can do to help avert a cultural tsunami


Any person with common sense can see that America is moving in the wrong direction. The “media elite” and much of the population continually mock the God of the Bible, diminish the value of marriage and family and have no concern for the sanctity of human life.

We’re headed straight into the ditch of out-of-control debt. Blind leaders are leading our blind nation toward a cliff. Thank goodness, some preachers and discerning Christians see what is coming and want to help right our ship of state.

One such individual is Jay W. Richards, an intellectual who has lectured before Congress and on leading universities nationwide. Jay has focused much attention on biblical economic principles—some of the best I’ve seen. Over the past couple of years, I have met with him on many occasions, and our hearts beat as one.

Jay and I began discussing the possibility of working on a significant book project together a number of months ago, and the result is Indivisible, which addresses restoring faith, family and freedom in America. read more

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Amplify Your Leadership

Connection is the beginning of all true influence—people will follow leaders they trust


From P.I. to preacher is not a common path, but it was mine. After graduating with a criminal justice administration degree at San Diego State University, I set out on a brief but fascinating career as a private investigator.

God had other plans. I had resisted God’s call, but it was time. While working as an investigator, I served in a small church as a student ministry leader. I soon found myself as a full-time master’s in divinity student at Asbury Theological Seminary. My three years there were fantastic. They were literally life changing. I was fired up and ready to serve in ministry, but I still had much to learn about leadership.

John Maxwell invited me to join his staff for one year as an intern at Skyline Wesleyan Church, which was located in a San Diego suburb. Little did I know that we would work together for 20 years, and reach thousands of people for Jesus.  read more

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Watchmen on the Walls

Calling pastors to help change the nation through prayer, preaching and partnership

 

As a teenager, I remember President Ronald Reagan’s vivid image of America as a “shining city on a hill,” echoing Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount. President Reagan meant that we are a beacon of light and hope for the rest of the world. Today, that beacon is growing dim.

Human life has become disposable. Abortion remains a tragic and open wound on our society. When miscarriages are not counted, fully 22 percent of all pregnancies end in abortion. The rate for African-Americans’ abortion in New York City is an astonishing 60 percent. More pre-born children die daily in America’s abortion centers than the casualty from the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Since abortion was legalized in 1973, there have been more than 50 million abortions. 

Our families are in disarray. More than 40 percent of children do not have married parents. Not surprisingly, only 45 percent of teenagers have spent their childhood with biological parents who were married.  read more

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Top-Down Tactics

Forget grassroots revival—widespread change is best achieved by a narrow focus


There is a seismic shift taking place today in the marketplace and the church. We need to understand how to respond if we are going to bring systemic transformation. There are ways the church should apply the gospel in response to cultural shifts.

First of all, it is a mistake to believe the culture will shift because of a church revival or a societal awakening. Often, we as believers think the key to societal transformation is to convert masses of people. But the truth is that culture is transformed by a small percentage of the population who make up the cultural elite in a society. Thus the only way to affect cultural change is to convert the elite who formulate culture in every sphere of society.

Second, it is a mistake to think that political victories will bring transformation. For example, abortion was legalized in 1973 yet the fight still rages on. Same-sex marriage has been legalized in several states in the Northeast, but the battle continues. Homosexuality has been normalized by art, media and entertainment, yet a large percentage of Americans still refuse to consider it as normative behavior. read more

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Preparing for the Next Great Awakening

Pastors need to twin prayer for spiritual revival with practical involvement in cultural reformation


Stand up for righteousness. Stand up for justice. Stand up for truth. And lo, I will be with you. Even until the end of the world.”

Those were the words that Martin Luther King Jr. heard as he prayed alone at his kitchen table in 1956. He had arrived in Montgomery, Ala., two years earlier, accepting the pastorate of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church rather than pursuing the academic career he had originally envisioned.

He soon found himself the head of the pastors’ association that led the famous bus boycotts. Increasing incidents of police harassment had caused Dr. King to ponder whether such activism was worth the risk to himself and his family. For 30 days in a row he had received daily death threats, so he paused to pray for guidance.

The Lord answered him clearly. It is hard to imagine what America would be like had King not answered the Lord’s call at that kitchen table. But because he did, our nation has made significant progress in living up to its own founding ideals of liberty and justice for all. read more

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Silence Is Not An Option

Why pastors simply must speak out on political issues

 

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Bishop Harry R. Jackson Jr.

Mathew D. Staver

Kevin Theriot

Bishop Harry R. Jackson Jr. interviewed Mathew D. Staver, founder and chairman of the Liberty Counsel; and Kevin Theriot, senior counsel for the Alliance Defense Fund (ADF), who discussed why pastors should not stay away from political issues—despite scrutiny from the IRS and groups threatening lawsuits.

Jackson: Mat, you have interacted with many pastors who believe they should “just preach” the gospel and stay away from political issues. What do you say to these church leaders? read more

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Crossover Calling

Despite long odds and strong opposition, apostolic minister Kimberly  Daniels won a city council seat after God led her to run for office 


Jacksonville, Fla., is my hometown. With 20-plus miles of beaches and the most beautiful river views in the world, it is a great place to vacation and even a better one to live.

However, my city—like most others—also has its negative side. Jacksonville is nationally known for violent crimes. I grew up in the LaVilla area, where as a child, I loved living in my neighborhood—located a few blocks from the office where I currently work as a city council representative. I received almost 93,000 votes after entering a political race a few weeks before the May 17, 2011 election.

Becoming an elected official seemed unreachable, considering my mother was a single mom of three daughters from three different men and my father owned a bar in LaVilla, which featured “Sissy Shows” (female impersonators). 

At times, I still feel like I am going to wake up one day and say, “I dreamed I was an at-large city council representative in Jacksonville.” As I look out my window onto the streets where I used to play, I cannot help but feel humbled. Though it is not a dream, it all started with one. read more

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Standing Up and Speaking Out

How the Manhattan Declaration is mobilizing silent-too-long Christians to protect life, marriage and religious freedom


It was Nov. 20, 2009 when more than 20 Christian leaders stood before the microphones at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Fox News, CNN, ABC News, The Wall Street JournalThe Washington Post and other media outlets were there with cameras and microphones.

There we announced the launch of the Manhattan Declaration. We proclaimed to the church—and put our nation’s political leaders on notice—that we would protect the sanctity of life, uphold the sacredness of marriage as a holy union between one man and one woman and defend religious freedom for all people.

In front of all those cameras and lights, the Christian leaders lovingly, winsomely and firmly took a stand. I will never forget the picture. I stood between Archbishop Donald Wuerl of Washington, D.C., and Cardinal Justin Rigali, archbishop of Philadelphia. I looked over at Jim Daly, president of Focus on the Family, and Ron Sider, president of Evangelicals for Social Action. To my left was Bishop Harry R. Jackson Jr., who mobilized African-American churches in the District of Columbia to oppose gay marriage. And there was Fr. Chad Hatfield, chancellor of St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Seminary. read more

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Building On Firm Foundations

Pastors must rediscover their historical, nation-shaping role


During the American Revolution, the British dubbed the courageous clergy “The Black Regiment”—a backhanded reference to the black robes they wore. The British blamed the clergy for America’s independence, and rightfully so as modern historians have documented that “there is not a right asserted in the Declaration of Independence, which had not been discussed by the New England clergy before 1763.” 

The rights listed in the Declaration of Independence were nothing more than a listing of sermon topics that had been preached from the pulpit in the preceding decades. Early clergy literally believed 2 Tim. 3:16-17—that all Scripture is God-inspired, and that God’s Word is to prepare us for every work.

Their sermons presented a biblical perspective on pressing public issues, including what type of taxes were and were not scriptural, how education should be conducted, the biblical role of the military, the difference between offensive and defensive wars, and the importance of having written constitutions of governance and electing godly leaders. The sermons touched on scores of other biblical topics, which the pulpit is largely silent on today. read more

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The Miracle of Marriage

Helping build strong marriages begins with recognizing their unique place in God’s creation

 

When you hold your first-born child, you immediately recognize two things. First, you realize that you are holding a miracle you did not create—but God did. Secondly, you are keenly aware that this miracle needs to be protected by you.

I have been counseling couples for more than 20 years, and I am well aware that just as each child is created by God and needs to be protected, equally so does each marriage. As the shepherd of a flock, be it a church or ministry, you are the protector for the marriages in your congregations and ministries.

Thank you for the many hours that you have invested in birthing marriages, offered premarital counseling and helped to save struggling couples. You have both the scars and joys shepherds accrue in having a family full of marriage from every level of depth.  read more

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Restoring the Fallen

  A blueprint for helping pastors and church leaders overcome sexual sins, and back into effective ministry

 

Counseling pastors who have fallen due to infidelity, pornography, prostitution or other sexual sins has been a regular occurrence in my office for the last 20 years.

When you do something for more than two decades, you learn quite a bit about those who fall and those who are able to get back into a growing ministry again. I’ve also learned a lot from those who fall but don’t go back to ministry, as well as others who go back in ministry without genuine healing and restoration. 

Falling happens in ministry. We can all conjure up names of the famous Christian leaders and pastors who have fallen in the last two decades. My guess is that you can also conjure up names of people in ministry you know personally who have fallen. I was on a plane one day after the national media reported that my pastor had fallen to sexual sin. read more

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Healing Marriages One at a Time

Dr. Doug Weiss has helped save thousands from sex addictions in the last 20 years. Today, he is passionate about empowering churches in strengthening and restoring marriages.


Dr. Doug Weiss is all about healing. He has devoted his life to healing the sexually broken. Through his work as a counselor and clinical psychologist as well as his many books, public speaking and numerous media appearances, Dr. Weiss  has been able to help rescue thousands from sex addictions and other problems. He claims an 85 percent success rate.

Yet in healing sex addiction, he’s really healing marriages. And in healing marriages, he’s putting lives back together and affecting the very fabric of our society at a time when it seems everything is trying to tear it apart.

So it was natural that I invite Dr. Weiss to be guest editor of this issue of Ministry Today. This year we have dealt with some of the important issues facing the church—such as integrity, prayer, giving, evangelism, church growth and leadership itself. None is more important than marriage. For the leader, unless you have this area of your life together, you are ineffective in all other areas. read more

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Addressing ‘Intimacy Anorexia’

 Why it’s critical to stop the silent cancer of many marriages from spreading through your ministry

 

As a Christian leader, you are more than likely dealing with 

marriages on a regular basis. You may have seen marriages destroyed by adultery, alcoholism or sexual addiction. Although devastating, the dissolving of this type of marriage, due to the circumstances, makes sense.

But there is another type of marriage that slowly dies and it’s harder to put a finger on the problem. This marriage often looks good on the outside for decades. The husband and wife may have been singing in the choir or served as cell group leaders, deacons and Sunday school teachers for years. They are raising their family, and some of them are doing a variety of marriage-related ministries. read more

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How to Have a Happy Marriage in Ministry

Building a strong marriage and a healthy church should not be at odds. Father-son pastors share their win-win strategies.


Is it possible to pastor a large congregation and have a happy marriage at the same time? Yes, say Larry Stockstill, a teaching pastor at Bethany World Prayer Center in Baton Rouge, La., and his son, Jonathan Stockstill, senior pastor of the 5,000-strong congregation.

Here the two pastors tell how God has helped them enjoy a strong marriage and fruitful ministry.

Larry Stockstill:

After 35 years of marriage, I believe a happy wife is the key to a happy marriage. It’s not in the Bible, but “if Mama ain’t happy, nobody’s happy!” The happiness in my marriage has been structured around seven basic principles. read more

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When it comes to marriage, ‘Thou Shalt Honor’

How honoring your spouse can turn your marriage into the most remarkable and rewarding experience of your life and ministry


Sometime back, I—being a loving, sensitive husband whose whole ministry is based on the concept of honoring others—was talking to my wife, Norma, on the phone. In the course of our conversation I asked, “What do you need from me that I’m not giving you right now?”

She responded, “You don’t know how to honor me.” Naturally, I laughed, assuming she was joking. I thought, “You can’t be serious!” I said, “That’s a good one! But what do you really need?” And she said with all seriousness, “No, I’m not kidding. You don’t know how to honor me.”

Honor Is a Diamond

Obviously, after all these years, we still need to work at this idea of honoring each other. And it is work. In my mind, honor is a diamond. We started out with a rough, raw stone. And over the years, I’ve made several major cuts and polishes, turning it into a beautiful gem. As far as I’m usually concerned, I’m doing a great job and it’s ready to mount and display. Norma, on the other hand—because she knows me better than anyone—realizes that there are still some rough surfaces, and she sees them all every day. read more

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Fasting Forward

Prepare your church for a 2012 breakthrough with a corporate fast in January


For several years now, many in my church, Free Chapel, have joined me in a 21-day fast to seek and honor God in January for the new year. By starting each year with a corporate fast, we have found that God meets with us in very unique and special ways. His presence grows greater and greater with each day of the fast. Without fail, He always shows up.

Corporately fasting in January is much the same precept as praying in the morning to establish the will of God for the entire day. I believe that, if we will pray and seek God and give Him our best at the first of the year, He will bless our entire year. “But seek ye first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you” (Matt. 6:33).

Short Season, Lasting Effect

Fasting is a short season that produces a lasting effect. Out of 365 days in a year, 21 days is not that long to take a break from your routine and experience a fresh encounter with God. We fast corporately as a church at the beginning of every year because that short season sets the course for the rest of the year. read more

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How Ministry Marriages Can Thrive

Avoiding three common traps will help your marriage not just survive


In the beginning, Karen and I were lay members of the church I now pastor. I worked in my family’s electronics and appliance business until one day, the pastor of our church asked me to come on staff as a marriage counselor. Karen and I had been leading a large Bible study, and many couples in the church had been coming to us for counseling.

So in August 1982, I joined the staff of Trinity Fellowship Church in Amarillo, Texas. My official role was marriage and pre-marriage counselor. Ten months later, the church’s senior pastor resigned and I was selected to take his place. Within a year, I’d gone from selling appliances to leading a church with 900 members. I wasn’t prepared, to say the least.

Karen and I had a strong marriage before I went on staff, but the burden of ministry had taken its toll on us almost immediately. After I became senior pastor, it intensified. I made a lot of mistakes as a husband and father. I saw the negative effect those mistakes had on Karen and our two children. read more

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Divorce-Proof Your Church

Ten keys for building rock-solid relationships that go the distance


Believe it or not, 85 percent of Americans still get married. Why? Because God created us that way. At the core of who we are, we long for safe, loving, committed relationships. You don’t have to look very far in the Bible to realize that He also wants to bless our love and marriage.

What’s troubling today is that the majority of couples eventually break up. Research estimates that between 40 to 50 percent of today’s marriages end in divorce. If you count couples that separate but don’t divorce, the statistic is even higher. The snowball effect? Tragically, one in three children now live in single-parent homes or do not live with their parents at all.

Behind pasted-on smiles and closed doors is a lot of brokenness from love gone bad. As a pastoral counselor and marriage and family therapist, I’ve sat and talked with countless clients, and over and over again I hear the same cry of the heart: “All I ever wanted was for someone to love me.” read more

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A Shepherd in the Boardroom

Examining the pastor’s role in mentoring business leaders


When Jesus turned over the tables of the money changers and chased out the dove sellers from the temple (see Matt. 21:12), He also launched a discussion among church and business leaders for centuries to follow.

The relationship between church and business ranges from the simple, “Would it be OK to place a brochure for my business in your lobby?” to the more complex, “Would your business donate materials to build a new gym for our youth?”

A slippery slope exists in the relationship between church and business. The primary issue seems to balance on the fulcrum of doing commerce in the church and receiving support from local business for church budgets. As church budgets continue to cope with declining revenue, the tipping point becomes less obvious. read more

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Volunteer Revolution

From recruiting to reproducing, here’s how to lead passionate servants into effective ministry


The volunteer is a unique hybrid—almost an employee and not quite a friend. Volunteers don’t get paid, yet they perform services of their own accord that benefit the local church. They are not co-workers with the paid staff, yet a bond of mutual ministry is often formed. Friendships can develop between volunteers in the pursuit of mutual service, but that is not the goal of the volunteer.

If a senior pastor understands who potential volunteers are, what they want from volunteer service and how they can be developed for effective service, 50 percent to 80 percent of a church’s staff needs could be filled—by volunteers!

 Who are potential volunteers?

Anyone who shows up is a potential volunteer. The mom who attends youth group with her teenager to keep an eye on the kid should be greeted, signed in and welcomed. At the end of the service she should be asked to pour soda at the refreshments table. read more

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Leading by Giving

Leadership, generosity and how a family is redefining generational wealth

 

David Green is founder and CEO of Hobby LobbyBorn in a pastor’s home, he began working at a local five-and-dime as a teen. After marrying his high school sweetheart, he and his wife, Barbara, began a small picture-frame shop, and in 1972 they opened their first retail store. Today Hobby Lobby has more than 475 stores in 40 states. David and Barbara have three grown children.

In 2007, his family made national headlines when they pledged $70 million to Oral Roberts University, which was $52 million in debt and facing unlawful termination lawsuits from three former professors. In the years since, ORU has experienced a dramatic turnaround in enrollment and financial stability. In the following interview, 
Dr. Mark Rutland, who was appointed president of ORU in 2009, chats with Green about the roots of his family’s generosity. read more

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Principles for leading a Turnaround

How to orchestrate a recovery in the wake of organizational catastrophe


In 2004, Hurricane Charley cut a devastating swath through central Florida and made a direct hit on our house. We had made the decision to ride out the storm, believing the weatherman that the worst of it would go elsewhere. He was wrong. 

 We watched in horror as a massive oak tree was sucked up like a giant broccoli plant and plunged into our swimming pool, barely missing the house. That blow could have utterly destroyed the house and very probably killed us. The damage was bad enough as it was.

When the howling wind stopped and the terrible night was over, the scene was a war zone. I will never forget the sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach as I forced the front door open and crawled out to survey wreckage greater than I ever imagined.  read more

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How to Train Your Successor

 Is there a way to retire from your pulpit and effectively mentor the incoming pastor? Yes—and two pastors have the model plan.


Is it possible for a church with a large congregation to successfully transition from a pastor of 38 years to a new and younger leader—and experience church growth at the same time? Absolutely, say pastor emeritus Kemp C. Holden and pastor Marty Sloan of Harvest Time church in Fort Smith, Ark.

Ten years ago, during a lengthy stay in the hospital, Holden heard the Lord tell him to position his church for 20 years of growth. As a result, he created a plan to find and train his replacement and prepare his 3,000-member congregation for the change of leadership. Not long afterward, he met Sloan—who was half Kemp’s age—and knew he was to become his successor. 

In this article, the pastors each tell how God helped them implement Kemp’s plan, which resulted not just in a successful pastoral transition at Harvest Time, but also in an increase of the church’s conversions, attendance and income.   read more

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Dr. Turnaround

Dr. Mark Rutland clearly knows how to save struggling organizations. But equally as impressive as his turnaround record is his passion to empower leaders like you for growth.


Anyone can lead when things are going great. Just show up and act like a leader! But when things are going down or there’s crisis, that’s when you find out who are the true leaders.

Dr. Mark Rutland is a true leader. He led a major turnaround in the 1990s at Calvary Assembly in Winter Park, Fla.—the church where Charisma started and where I served on staff for five years. He did it again at Southeastern College (now University) in Lakeland, Fla., where my dad was a professor when I was a teen. Now he’s doing it again at Oral Roberts University (ORU).

Calvary Assembly went through a painful scandal in 1981. And though the church survived, it went from 5,000 attendees to 1,800 within a nine-year period while taking on huge debt to build a 5,500-seat sanctuary. Rutland was able to stave off bankruptcy, heal a hurting congregation and build up attendance to 3,600 before he left. read more

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Living Flame Of Love

Daily practices for reigniting spiritual passion

 


Saint John of the Cross described his relationship with Jesus as the “living flame of love.” The two men Jesus walked with on the road to Emmaus testified that their hearts burned within them as Jesus opened the Scriptures (see Luke 24:32). How do leaders feed this living flame so that the daily pressures of ministry do not smother the fire that should drive our service in the first place?

In my own life, I experienced renewed love for Jesus as I began to see in the Scripture that God relates to His church as His bride and burns with passion and zeal for her. From Genesis through Revelation, one of the themes of the Scriptures is God’s ravished heart for His people. We discover Him as the one who leaves the Father’s home in heaven to cling to His bride and be united to her as a husband becomes one flesh with his wife.

We find Him in the prophetic pictures of Isaac and Rebekah, of Boaz and Ruth, of Esther and the king. We are strengthened by the king’s declaration of love for the bride in the Song of Solomon. We feel the anguish of the Bridegroom’s heart in the prophetic writings as He grieves the spiritual adultery of His people, and we are continually moved by the constancy of His longing for intimacy and commitment to restoration. read more

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A Life of 24/7 Prayer

Mike Bickle and IHOP-KC prove prayer is far from a boring chore

 

 

Two years ago I spent a week in the prayer room at the International House of Prayer (IHOP-KC), led by Mike Bickle. I’ve known Mike for more than 20 years; I’ve watched his vision for 24/7 prayer unfold. I’ve seen the consistency of his life. I’ve watched how his emphasis on prayer, his understanding of the Tabernacle of David and a type of prayer he calls “Harp and Bowl” has changed the lives of thousands—including mine.

God did some deep things in my life that week in Kansas City, Mo., as I spent hours in God’s presence and studying the Word. He also used Mike to surprise me with a lesson on prayer. One afternoon Mike invited me to sit in on a teaching for his leaders. He talked about the importance of systematic prayer using a written prayer list. With a written list, he said, you’ll pray 10 times more than you will without it. Then he handed out a sheet using an acronym for FELLOWSHIP as a model for intimate prayer. (Go to ministrytodaymag.com/fellowshipprayerlist to download a free copy.)

That week I began using a written prayer list and following Mike’s method of intimate prayer. I also began journaling and spending at least an hour in prayer most days. It’s a discipline I continue today. read more

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A Holy Convergence

Unity between the prayer and missions movements has Jesus’ name written all over it

 


God is arranging a glorious convergence in the earth between prayer ministry and missionary activity. One of our favorite parts of our story at the International House of Prayer of Kansas City, Mo., is the way He brought us into partnership with Youth With A Mission, one of the world’s largest missions agencies. Committing to pray for the ministry of YWAM is a privilege for us, because what God has joined together—missions and prayer ministry—must not be put asunder, and we get to participate in their union.

God’s love is only seen in fullness when the whole body of Christ functions together, and part of our inheritance at IHOP–KC is in the fruit of other ministries. Some speak of “the prayer movement” and “the missions movement” as though they are distinct—if not in conflict with each other. In identifying particular expressions of God’s work, we sometimes lose sight of their integrity. Each of these two movements has attracted some criticism—missions groups for not praying enough and prayer movements for not reaching out in missions enough. 

However, missions is not the ultimate goal; worship is. As John Piper so eloquently writes, “Missions exists because worship doesn’t.” Worship is ultimate because Jesus read more

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Church On The Brink

Can unified intercession avert national destruction and bring spiritual renewal?


 

In 1995, in his book The Coming Revival, Bill Bright called 2 million Americans to fast and pray for 40 days because of the dire state of our nation and our great need for revival. He warned: “God does not tolerate sin. The Bible and history make this painfully clear. I believe God has given ancient Israel as an example of what will happen to the United States if we do not experience revival. He will continue to discipline us with all kinds of problems until we repent or until we are destroyed, as was ancient Israel because of her sin of disobedience.”

Sept. 11 came and went. Katrina followed suit. The church’s moral and spiritual decay continues, with entire institutions unclear on the divinity of Christ and the atoning efficacy of the cross but clear on the ordination of homosexuals and the protection of a woman’s right to choose.

A global financial crisis still exists, and along the Pacific Ring of Fire some nations are recovering and others are on edge. Yet, have we connected our hearts to the crisis? Our keen leadership insights and makeshift rebuilding strategies will not suffice in a culture devoid of discernment and prayer. read more

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Blueprint For War

God’s plans for victorious spiritual battle

 


The apostle Paul exposed Satan’s strongholds to help the New Testament church make sense of the enemy’s outrageous victories. “We do not wrestle against flesh and blood,” he taught, “but against principalities, against powers” (Eph. 6:12).

To partner with Jesus in fulfilling the Great Commission and establishing justice in the earth, the church must renounce fear and fatalism and recover the prevailing faith behind Paul’s frontal attack against the forces of darkness. Souls are bound in the most desperate spiritual and physical captivity. In answer to racism, abortion, sex-trafficking and false ideologies, God is raising up His house of prayer. His church must learn to contend, to wrestle with and throw down its spiritual adversaries.

In 1996, under the urgency of prophetic direction, I was part of a 40-day fast. During this season of intense prayer and divine initiative the Lord gave me my job description. I saw in a dream a Buddhist house of prayer situated on top of and dominating a Christian house of prayer. In a great wrestling match, the Christian house of prayer flipped from its inferior position to dominate the Buddhist house of prayer. read more

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More Than Songs

 How worship on earth invites the atmosphere of heaven



It doesn’t take a prophet to see that the earth is in a crisis, and it doesn’t take a pessimist to see that much of the church is lukewarm. Yet it is in this environment that the Lord is raising up a worldwide movement of prayer and worship. In an hour of confusion, as chaos grows and darkness deepens, the Lord is awakening the dawn of a new day (see Is. 24:15). We see the dawn breaking upon the horizon with songs of worship in this dark night; it is a global house of worship made up of the entire body of Christ.

But the day is not dawning without conflict. The battle at the end of the age will be a battle for the passion of man, a war between two worship movements. Even now Satan is assaulting the cultures of the earth in an unceasing demonic campaign to raise up a worldwide worship movement (see Rev. 13:4,8,15). He is enticing people to worship themselves, which will lead them to worship him. But Jesus also has a plan in His heart, and His will not fail.

Around the globe young people are catching a glimpse of the beauty and worth of Jesus and how He is worshipped in heaven. As they begin to understand the authority they have in intercession, they are taking their rightful place in the kingdom and will bring a multitude with them to the throne of grace. read more

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Vital Signs

Seven characteristics of the end-time prayer and worship movement

 


What we are witnessing today, with the rapidly growing worldwide prayer and worship movement, is the beginning of the fulfillment of biblical prophecies about the end times. No one knows the day or the hour of Jesus’ return, but we do know that it will be in response to the church—His bride—beckoning Him to come (see Rev. 22:17). While Scripture is filled with the defining characteristics of this end-time worship and prayer movement, I want to focus on seven that I believe are particularly key.

1. It will be God-centered (Rev. 4:8; 5:11-14; Is. 24:14–16). Those nearest God’s throne are most qualified to proclaim the truth about who He is and what He does. God desires that His people would encounter His majesty and love and that in turn they would offer up their praise for who He is. Worship is a witness on earth to the indescribable value of Jesus. Our worship and prayer are best energized when we experience intimacy with God’s heart. The Father relates to us with tender mercy, and Jesus, our Bridegroom God, relates to us with fiery desire (see Is. 54:5; 62:5). In Revelation 22:17, John prophesied that the Spirit and the bride would say, “Come, Lord Jesus!”

2. It will be continual (Rev. 4:8; Is. 62:6-7; Luke 18:7-8). In Revelation John witnesses celestial beings who “do not rest day or night, saying: ‘Holy, holy, holy ...’ ” (see Rev. 4:8). God desires to be worshipped on this earth just as He is in heaven—unceasingly. Isaiah prophesied of an end-time prayer movement that will not rest night and day until God’s purposes are fully established (see Is. 62:6-7), and Jesus spoke of prayer going forth night and day until His justice is fully released (see Luke 18:7-8). read more

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My House Shall Be Called...

Beyond programs and prayer meetings, the church today must embrace its role as an eternal house of intercession

 


The house of prayer in a city is not a church, not a prayer ministry and not the building in which they meet. The International House of Prayer in Kansas City, Mo., is only a “gas station”—we take a cup of gasoline and throw it on the prayer fires that burn in the real “house of prayer in Kansas City,” which is the entire body of Christ, made up of more than 1,000 congregations in our area.

The eternal destiny of all God’s people is to function as a house of prayer now and in the age to come. In one short statement, Jesus revealed this to us when He prophetically declared, “My house shall be called a house of prayer” (Matt. 21:13).

Isaiah also spoke this decree when he prophesied to Israel: “My house shall be called a house of prayer for all nations” (see Is. 56:7). When God calls us by a specific name, it indicates our character and how we are to function in the Holy Spirit. read more

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Why I Know Hell Is Real

The reality of eternity without Christ compels me to preach the gospel

 


For the most part, the subject of hell has not been a topic of discussion in churches today. One of the reasons is that, in the past, hell was presented with a fire-and-brimstone, “you’re going to burn” attitude. As a result, it is a message perceived of as unloving and harsh. However, if it is presented as a message of warning, and not of condemnation, it is more readily accepted. A message of warning is a message of love. What loving parent wouldn’t warn his or her child not to play in a busy street? If a person truly understands what eternity might bring, they may be a bit more receptive to the gospel. God’s desire is to get people into heaven, not keep them out!

Another reason the topic is avoided is because of a lack of answers as to the “whys” regarding the extreme severity and eternal duration of hell. To many, God would be unloving to allow such punishment for all eternity.

This lack of teaching—and even ignoring of the subject altogether—is derived from a questioning of the morality of God. Some criticize His justice, stating that if they were God they wouldn’t allow someone to suffer forever, so then God certainly wouldn’t either. A lack of understanding causes silence on the subject. If hell is mentioned, it is downplayed in order to avoid offending anyone. The fear of loss of congregation members is on the minds of many pastors. read more

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Igniting the Fire of Evangelism

How the evangelistic spark of a mass crusade is fanned into a burning flame

 


As the gospel is preached clearly and concisely each night, hundreds of thousands of precious people respond to the call of salvation and receive Jesus as their Savior. Such is the dimension of this response that the hundreds of participating churches are each flooded with thousands of new converts and wonderful reports pour in from the leaders and members of participating churches.

Often we hear of congregations doubling and tripling in size during the weeks following the Great Gospel Campaigns. We have learned that this leads some churches to even start multiple branches to accommodate the new arrivals. On the CfaN team, we call this Spirit-enabled phenomenon “addition” to the kingdom of God.

But our ministry team feels a second responsibility, and that is to inspire and train others in the communities and nations in which we hold crusades to—as the Apostle Paul instructed Timothy—“do the work of an evangelist” (see 2 Tim. 4:5). read more

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A Passion for Souls

Think Reinhard Bonnke and his ministry are all about the numbers? You better believe it—and here’s why that’s a good thing.



 

I was a young journalist attending an international conference in Nairobi, Kenya, in 1984 when I saw fliers all over town for a German evangelist named Reinhard Bonnke, who was holding huge crusades throughout Kenya. Knowing Germany wasn’t exactly a hotbed of evangelism, I was curious. African friends told me about this man’s passion to see all of Africa saved. Soon we were covering his ministry in Charisma. One of our first stories was about his massive revival tent that held up to 34,000 people. In 1985, a storm destroyed the tent in South Africa—but in the end, it didn’t seem to matter since it couldn’t have contained the hundreds of thousands who showed up.

I first met Bonnke in Brazil in 1989 when he was there for his daughter’s wedding. My wife and I had flown down to attend a Charles and Frances Hunter crusade in Rio de Janeiro, and we stayed at the same hotel as Bonnke. A friendship developed that continues today. Little did I know he would one day move his international headquarters to Orlando, Fla., which allows us to interact several times a year—most recently when he wanted to introduce me last fall to his successor, Daniel Kolenda. I actually knew Daniel’s family and visited his dad’s church in Port Charlotte, Fla., when Daniel was a little boy. In Charisma’s March issue we covered the incredible story about how after some unsuccessful attempts to find a successor, God supernaturally told Bonnke that the anointed must be appointed. (They recount this story on page 50 of this issue.)

When I recently began inviting leaders to serve as guest editors for Ministry Today, I never dreamed someone of Bonnke’s worldwide stature would agree. But when we mentioned to him our vision to devote an entire issue to the topic of evangelism—and just how important it is for the church—he jumped at the chance. He has edited the issue with the same fervency he seems to apply to everything in life. And the idea of including Daniel Kolenda as co-editor appealed to us. Bonnke can explain better than I how Kolenda is transitioning to fill his huge shoes. read more

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Race Against Time

We must seize the opportunity of a lifetime—to win the nations for Jesus—during the lifetime of the opportunity

 


When my great-grandfather received the baptism of the Holy Spirit at an Aimee Semple McPherson camp meeting, the Lord gave him a life-altering vision. He saw what he described as an “ocean of humanity,” a multitude of people that stretched to the horizon. Their hands were lifted toward heaven and they were crying out, “Bread, bread—give us bread!” 

For the rest of his days, he considered that heavenly vision to be his life’s calling. Even though my great-grandfather never witnessed the fulfillment of the vision God had given him, two generations later I have seen it with my own eyes as I have had the privilege to preach to millions of people in Africa alongside evangelist Reinhard Bonnke. There is a wonderful reality in the economy of God’s kingdom. His calling and promises never die with

the original recipient, and nothing diminishes in God. His desire is that each generation would seize the baton of the gospel from the previous one and carry it further so that in the end those who sow and those who reap will rejoice together. read more

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Plugged In to Prayer

Life-transforming power comes when intercession and preaching are fully connected

 


I was preaching to approximately 120,000 people in the stadium when a power cut suddenly bathed the entire crowd in pitch darkness. Then the emergency generators kicked in, and soon the place was all lit up again. 

I can think of no better example of how intercession and evangelism work together. Regardless of what powerful lights we had, without electricity the place would have remained in darkness, the sound system powerless and the message unheard—regardless of how loud I tried to shout.

On the other hand, no matter how much electricity we were able to generate, without the lights and sound system it would not have had the impact desired. Intercession is the “powerhouse,” and the preaching of the Word of God is the “electricity” that projects the light of God into this world of sin and darkness. read more

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Called to Succeed

Evangelists Reinhard Bonnke and Daniel Kolenda talk about the succession of leadership at Christ for all Nations and their ministry expectations going forward

 


MINISTRY TODAY: Why did you decide to appoint a successor to your ministry?

REINHARD BONNKE: I want the extraordinary harvest of souls to continue for as long as the opportunity lasts. What my team and I have experienced since the year 2000 is possibly unparalleled in the history of the church—masses of precious souls have been pressing into the kingdom of God.

MINISTRY TODAY: The Lord has used you for more than 35 years to lead Christ for all Nations. Was it a difficult decision for you to give up the leadership? read more

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The Soul Purpose

Why the church must return the Great Commission to top priority

 


However, as one of the fivefold ministries given to the church, my perspective as an evangelist belongs with that of the apostle, the prophet, the pastor and teacher. Taken together, these five visions equip the saints to do the work of the ministry. 

So, what does this evangelist see? I see two disturbing trends:

First, I see churches that are not increasing. They sit in communities where the population is growing, children are born, immigrants move in, jobs attract new families, government programs attract the needy, yet these churches remain stagnant. They are growing inward, forgetting the imperative of the Great Commission.  read more

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America: The New Dark Continent?

Africa, the ‘dark continent’ of history, is lit today with revival. Is America the new dark land—and can the same light shine here?

 

 

Those familiar with my story know that early in my ministry God gave me a vision of a blood-washed Africa. I saw an entire continent washed in the blood of the Lamb. How preposterous it seemed at the time! Today, not so much. This vision led and guided me to the astonishing harvest we see in Africa today.

With these millions coming to Jesus, some American friends have begun to ask, “What about a blood-washed America? Can it happen here?” My answer is, “Yes, of course.” But I wonder, What sort of God do my American friends believe in? A God omnipotent in Africa and impotent in America? May it never be. The time has come to speak boldly of a blood-washed America. The gospel is the major force for change on earth, and I sense that America is ripe for change.

The church has been listening to the wrong voices. It has been paralyzed by lies. Professors of religion talk arrogantly of a post-Christian culture, as if this is somehow the graveyard of evangelism. Post-Christian? There is no such thing. The Word of God has never returned void in any generation. It has always remained quick, alive and sharper than a two-edged sword, no matter the label given by academia. read more

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A Word for You

Knowing how Bibles are translated will help you pick the version you need

 

 

In translating any ancient text, determining how literal the translation should be must be decided first. To create a translation, one of three general methods is applied to the translating process: word-for-word or formal equivalence, in which the meaning of the original words is expressed; thought-for-thought or dynamic equivalence, in which the thoughts and ideas of the original text are expressed; paraphrase or functional equivalence, also a thought-for-thought method in which the thoughts and ideas of the original text are reworded for clarity or for a specific readership.

Word-for-Word

For this, the translator attempts a literal rendering of each word of the original language into the receptor language and seeks to preserve the original word order and sentence structure, without adding his ideas and thoughts.

Thus, the argument goes, the more literal the translation is, the less danger there is of corrupting the original message. Critics of this translation method say it assumes too much—specifically that the reader has a moderate degree of familiarity with the subject matter.

Also, a grammatically complete sentence does not always result from a word-for-word translation. Words must sometimes be added to complete the English sentence structure. Most printings of the King James Version, for example, italicize words that are implied but are not actually in the original source text. Thus, even a formal equivalence translation has at least some modification of sentence structure and regard for contextual usage of words. read more

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The Forgotten Heroes

The significance of a ministry shouldn’t be measured by the type of people it is reaching

 

 

The year: 1967. The location:?Swallow Falls,?Md. A 7-year-old red-headed boy jumps out of the car, eager to embark on a long-awaited adventure. The sound of the cool, rushing water beckons him as he races to the crown of the cascade. At the first glimpse of the waterfall, his curious mind starts to wonder, Where’s all this water going?

He jumps from rock to rock, working to gain a clearer view. Finally, he’s close enough to peer over the edge, but just as he catches the first glimpse, his foot slips. He quickly begins the slide downward, when out of nowhere a hand reaches out and grabs his arm. The boy holds his breath for fear that any movement might cause the hand to lose grip. Wide-eyed, he watches as a gold watch falls from the wrist and takes its place among the rocks below. At last, he breathes in relief as he’s pulled to safety. read more

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Where Did All the Young People Go?

Going beyond style to substance to empower the next generation in your church



Our church is overwhelmed with young converts. In fact, of the thousands that come to our services each week, more than 70 percent are younger than 29. And about 40 percent of them didn’t attend a church before they came to Substance Church. Pastors often ask me, “What are you doing to get all of these young people?” Honestly, that’s a critical question that the American church had better start asking soon.

Contrary to the exaggerated claims of attendance, as David Olson noted in The American Church in Crisis, only 9.1 percent of Americans attend any evangelical or charismatic church on a weekly basis. Even scarier is the fact that the vast majority of this number are quickly becoming senior citizens. In other words, there is a generation of young people who have totally given up on the church as we know it. read more

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The Attractional church

How to attract people who are ready to receive God’s Word



Is it possible to improve the environment of your church so that the seed of God’s Word has a better chance of growing? There is a movement of churches that believe so, and because of their ability to attract large numbers of people to their places of worship, these churches have been described as attractional. But is there biblical grounds for this model of ministry?

In the parable of the sower and the seed in Matthew 13:1-23, Jesus presents the results of seeds sown in different environments—different types of soil. Some soil was not conducive to growth, and the seed was either stolen away, produced little fruit or didn’t grow at all. In other words, the Word could not produce fruit in the wrong environment. It sounds close to heresy to say that God’s Word needs the right environment to be effective, but according to the parable, this is the case.  read more

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Honoring a General-Web

Prior to Billy Hornsby's death, friends and leaders from across the nation paid tribute to ARC's inspirational co-founder, president and spiritual father. We've gathered some of those tributes here to honor Billy and give you a sense of what a true spiritual general he was.

 


When I asked Billy Hornsby to serve as guest editor for the March/April issue of Ministry Today and share the amazing story of the Association of Related Churches (ARC), we had no idea he’d be battling for his life. I knew Billy was dealing with cancer, but he’d made it sound as if it wasn’t too bad. Sadly, since the time the articles were assigned and turned in to us, the cancer became so aggressive it affected his everyday functioning.  

In February the ARC’s senior leaders recognized this and gathered in Birmingham, Ala., to pay tribute to Billy’s leadership and to bid him farewell. Rick Bezet, who was featured on the cover of Ministry Today last summer, was one of those. He told me that Billy not only taught them how to live, but also showed them how to die: “He’s shown us how enormous the peace of God is when facing death. I’ve never seen anyone so ‘on’—so totally connected to the voice of God.”

I was honored to visit Billy at his home in Birmingham, Ala., during his last days. Billy was the sort of man you felt was one of your best friends even if you hadn't known him long. I published one of his books a few years back but didn’t get to know him well until a year ago. He told me he approached every relationship as if he would be a friend for life. He certainly treated me that way, and every time I was with Billy—whether in person or on the phone—I came away feeling better.

Billy’s heart for church planting and his vision made the ARC take off. He challenged Greg Surratt on a golf course to create a model of churches that would emphasize life, draw others and grow. Surratt agreed to help him, and the first two churches they planted were New Life Church in Conway, Ark., and Church of the Highlands in Birmingham. Within a decade each had been recognized as the fastest-growing congregation in the country.

The day after Christmas Billy taught on “Struggling Well,” giving hope and encouragement to others. A few weeks later he gathered the ARC leaders and told them to keep their relationships strong and to continue the work he started. One by one they embraced him and thanked him for believing in them. Billy described this period to me as “the best two weeks of my life.”

Billy's gift of establishing strong relationships and peer accountability is badly needed in the church. He raised up good leaders and undoubtedly the ARC will continue to grow and prosper. Part of that is because Billy always believed in people. In fact, Rick Bezet told me that one of Billy’s parting words to the ARC leaders was, “Make sure you believe in someone no one believes in.”

As we pay tribute to a general in the church-planting movement, I'm sad for our loss, yet I celebrate the legacy Billy left behind that's found in the countless people he believed in to do great things for God.  

Steve Strang

Founder/Publisher, Charisma and Ministry Today


f-Strang-HonorGeneral-ScottHornsbyMy name is Scott Hornsby, and I’m Billy Hornsby’s brother. Billy and I are 14 months apart and have shared one of the most remarkable friendships you can have—not just as family, but also for almost 40 years as brothers in the Lord and more than 30 years as fellow ministers. 

Any ministry relationship is vital, but to walk through our callings together has been so special. We’ve had each other’s support through the good and difficult times of our lives. I always knew I had someone in my corner and because of that, when I was down, I felt like getting up again.

Billy’s life has always been an inspiration to me because I saw in his life a burden to help the underdog. When no one else would believe in a person with limited abilities, Billy saw a spark of greatness in that person and helped ignite that spark into a blazing fire. 

I believe one of the greatest compliments you can give someone you grew up with is respect. I’ve seen my brother Billy used by God as a great husband, father, brother, church planter, pastor, missionary, songwriter, author and president of one of the greatest church- planting organizations in the world. He ordained me, he’s one of my presbyters and he is my best friend. Billy has inspired me to be better, reach higher, love unconditionally, give more and never give up.

To the best brother a man could have! Thanks, Billy.

Scott Hornsby 

Senior Pastor, Fellowship Church

Zachary, La.

 

f-Strang-HonorGeneral-GregSurrattBilly Hornsby is someone God brought into my life at just the right time to encourage me to be and achieve something I thought I couldn’t do on my own. 

About 10 years ago I had a dream to plant 2,000 churches in my lifetime. I had been a part of planting four churches, including the one I’m still in, Seacoast Church. And of the other three churches, two of them failed miserably. At about that time God brought this bigger-than-life, bald-headed Cajun into my life, named Billy Hornsby, and it changed my life forever. 

I’ve learned from Billy the value of a friend. I’ve always longed for the type of friendship I’ve read about in the Bible—David and Jonathan, Ruth and Naomi, Paul and Timothy. Billy has been that kind of friend to me. He looked me in the eye over and over again and told me he loved me. It was uncomfortable for me at first, but Billy pressed in, and I desperately needed that. He even made me an honorary Cajun!

His Billyisms on relationships stick with you; like, the four words that diffuse anger in any relationship: “You might be right.” There are others: “Let your subordinates shine”; “When you back someone into a corner let them out”; “Add value to every person you have responsibility for or a relationship with”; and “Don’t ask a fat person if they’ve lost weight, because they haven’t!”

I’ve also learned from Billy the value of having our treasure in heaven. I heard Billy say many times when he was thinking about life decisions or trying to convince the ARC board why we should believe in a church planter who was struggling somewhere: “Why would we leave all we know for something that we’re unsure of? Because we live our lives these days for treasures in heaven.” 

I saw Billy live that. I often think I need to get a bracelet that says WWBD—What Would Billy Do?—because I want to be like him. I’m proud to say, more than anything else, that Billy Hornsby is my friend.  

Greg Surratt

Lead Pastor, Seacoast Church

Mount Pleasant, S.C.

 

f-Strang-HonorGeneral-DinoRizzoIt has been a blessing to have some truly great men impact my life. But when I met Billy Hornsby about 11 years ago, he brought a whole new dimension of mentoring to the table. 

He is for me a big brother who has lived so much already. He has lived out just about every type of relationship scenario one can live, and as a result he has a deep well of wisdom when it comes to being a peacemaker—navigating and diffusing relationship challenges. 

He truly is a peacemaker. I’m thankful he took the time to invest in me to teach me from those strengths he was so rich with.

“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God” (Matt. 5:9).

Dino Rizzo

Lead Pastor, Healing Place Church

Baton Rouge, La.

 

f-Strang-HonorGeneral-RickBezetBilly has always been a strong man, physically and spiritually. When he came on staff at the church where I worked, all of the younger pastors wanted to be near him because of his enthusiasm and commitment to Christ. His house was always the favorite destination, for many reasons. We loved the fact that if he were to see a fault in any of us, he would confront it head-on and tell us that any unresolved problem in our lives would inevitably affect our ministry. 

Lately, as members of the ARC have gathered around him, he has continued to challenge all of us to remain unified and clean. There has not been even a hint of division between the members, and he keeps telling us that humility will keep it that way. Most importantly, he said: “Always believe in the person nobody else believes in. Even if it takes breaking your own rules, then believe in them anyway.” 

It is because of Billy’s values and strength that we have been able to accomplish what we have done. And that is why so many people love him.

“Love ... bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things” (1 Cor. 13:6-7).

Rick Bezet

Lead Pastor, New Life Church

Conway, Ark.

 

f-Strang-HonorGeneral-MattKellerIn February of 2003, I had my first experience with Billy Hornsby and it vastly changed the trajectory of my life and ministry forever. Up until then I had been a struggling church planter who had felt pushed out of the current circle of relationships I had been raised in.

Billy Hornsby saw potential in me and believed in the dream that God had placed inside of our hearts for Fort Myers, Fla. After Billy came and spent a weekend encouraging our leadership team, I’ll never forget saying to them, “I really think he believes in us!” From that day forward, everything changed for Next Level Church. We finally knew we weren’t alone, and there’s no better feeling than that.

Billy Hornsby believed in me when we weren’t sure anyone else did. I know my story is multiplied hundreds of times over in other pastors and leaders in the body of Christ today as well.

Thank you, Billy Hornsby, for seeing what I was having a hard time seeing in myself.

Matt Keller

Lead Pastor, Next Level Church

Fort Myers, Fla. 

 

f-Strang-HonorGeneral-CoreyWilliamsWhen I think of Pastor Billy, I think of someone who is dedicated to the call of God on his life, both in season and out of season. I see a man who is dedicated to his ministry, dedicated to his family and dedicated to life. 

Pastor Billy, thank you for being my pastor, my mentor and my friend. Thank you for allowing me in your home, to witness firsthand the extent of your commitment to Mrs. Charlene as she battled her own illness, to watch you tend to her needs, considering your own battle was amazing and somewhat divine. Thank you for taking the time to see something in us and picking up this flicker and breathing on it until we became a flame. You are my David, my Joshua, my Moses, my Paul! Truly you are one of God’s generals.

Corey Williams

Lead Pastor, Life in the Spirit Church

Jacksonville, Fla.

 

f-Strang-HonorGeneral-JoeChampionOf all the people I’ve been impacted by, no one has meant more than Billy Hornsby. It was 2002 in Memphis, Tenn., where Billy shared with us the principles of the ARC. And from that day forward, our church has not stopped growing. To Billy Hornsby: Thank you. To your life, to your heart, to your spirit, I’m forever indebted to you.

Joe Champion

Senior Pastor, Celebration Church

Austin, Texas

 

 

 

f-Strang-HonorGeneral-JohnSiebelingI’m so thankful for the impact that Billy Hornsby has had on my life. His vision to make a difference in this world and his incredible leadership gift have helped so many of us live, think and lead at a higher level. In watching Billy live his life, I’ve seen an amazing example of what it means to lead people. His genuine love for people and passion for family are hallmarks of Billy’s life. There’s simply no way to measure the number of lives that have been impacted through Billy’s Hornsby’s life and ministry. 

Billy, thank you for your passion, your encouragement and your commitment to living a life of integrity. All of these qualities and so many more have touched my life in a deep way. You have paved the way for so many people, and our lives are better, richer and stronger because of you.

John Siebeling

Lead Pastor, The Life Church

Cordova, Tenn.

 

f-Strang-HonorGeneral-CaseyHenaganI have known Billy Hornsby for 20 years, and it has been an honor and a privilege. He’s been an incredible influence in my life and ministry. One of the attributes I admire most about Billy is that he’s not afraid to tell you the 10 percent—that small portion of hard truth that can change your life, if you’re willing to listen. 

Even with his tough exterior, you quickly learn that he’s one of your biggest fans. He has a keen ability to help you see great things in you. He’s walked with me through two of my most challenging moments: the deaths of my child and my mother. Likewise, he’s celebrated some of my life’s greatest victories, one being the planting of Keypoint Church six years ago. His influence gave me courage to take such a giant leap of faith. If I’ve done anything noteworthy, it’s because I’m standing on the shoulders of great men like Billy Hornsby.

Casey Henagan

Lead Pastor, Keypoint Church

Bentonville, Ark.

 

f-Strang-HonorGeneral-TonySheryllAshmoreSheryll and I were in our car on the way to a beach break, listening to a CD someone gave us. We were several months into our third church plant and were soaking up anything we could find that would help us be better pastors and leaders. As we listened to the simple thoughts being presented on the CD, we both came to the same conclusion at the same time: We needed this man in our life. 

A few weeks later we walked up to Billy Hornsby at an ARC roundtable in Birmingham, Ala., and told him, “We need you to be our friend.” The following Sunday he was in our church sharing his simple thoughts about doing church.

Billy means it when he says he is your friend. The day he said that to us, our lives changed. Our church is stronger and we are better pastors because of that friendship. There is a rare group of people you meet along the way in your journey who just make you better because they are around. The body of Christ is stronger, safer and more secure because Billy and Charlene Hornsby are part of it.   

Tony and Sheryll Ashmore

Pastors, LifeGate Church

Villa Rica, Ga. read more

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To the Jew First

Why God’s order for world evangelism prioritizes sharing the gospel with Jewish people First


 

When I think about the impact of the church’s ministry around the world—how believers are joining arms to share the love and gospel of Jesus Christ with others—I’m thankful that the call on the church is so much greater than the challenge. Our God-given commission to help the nations can often feel daunting and sometimes even overwhelming. 

That’s because we’re trying to reach people with the message of God’s love while they’re hungry, hurt and oppressed. It’s not enough to simply talk to them. In many countries, people are just trying to survive without the basic necessities of life.  read more

The Perfect Model of Integrity

When I turned 50, my staff surprised me with a set of golf clubs. After numerous golfing trips "plow-ing up the course," I resorted to watching videos. My game immediately improved when I learned how to deliver the perfect swing from pros. Hours of written "tips" could not compare to watching master golfers at work.


I heard a funny story about a Bible college professor who would sling his thick hair backward with a swoop when-ever he made a strong point in his preaching.


Ironically, years later his students were also "slinging their hair." Someone discovered that even a student who was bald was slinging his head!


What makes people do what they see and not what they hear?


While traveling through Greece and Turkey for 17 days in 2009, I was struck by Paul's apostolic method of "father-ing." He had no Bible school (not even Bibles!), sermon series or buildings.


His method was to take about 18 young men from different backgrounds in the New Testament to be his traveling companions. His Christ-like example modeled his Christian life before them until they were his "dear sons," and then sent them as his envoys to plant, build and correct his churches.


The apostle Paul makes his intentions known in 2 Thessalonians 3:9, "We did this, not because we do not have the right to such help, but in order to make ourselves a model for you to follow" (NIV). The model consisted of 10 parts, and focused on integrity, purity and example.

Integrity Matters
Integrity comes from the root word "integer" and means whole number. It is something that is whole with no parts missing or fractions. Integrity, then, is to be a whole, together, healthy person. In my interaction with spiritual leaders, I have seen the need for integrity in several major areas of ministry:


Finances-Surprised by this one? Don't be. Jesus used money more than any other metaphor to demonstrate faith-fulness. When money reaches our hands, we quickly demonstrate our true character just as Ananias and Sapphira, Judas, Gehazi and Achan did in the Bible. Here are a few principles to help lay out some "boundaries" for financial integrity:

  • Use designated funds for exactly the reason they were given or return them to the donor. Always pay bills when they are due, and don't use "cash management" procedures.

  • Maintain a correct church budget at all times. Start with missions at 10 percent, keep salaries at 20 percent to 40 percent; never let money allocated for buildings exceed 35 percent, and an adequate savings should fall between 5 percent and 10 percent.

  • Don't go into business with church members. This changes the pastoral relationship from "overseer" to "money-making partner."

  • Offer fair, not exorbitant salaries. A compensation committee should determine the pastor's salary, and any other member of his family or controlling party.

  • Don't pressure people for finances. This will help you maintain an atmosphere of liberty in ministry. Building pro-jects should be congregation-driven instead of pastor-driven. After all, they are the ones who need the building, not you!

  • Keep financial statements of expenditures. A financial statement actually helps your church as congregants sense accountability and see the true cost of running the ministry.


Commitments—Simply put, keep your promises. My grandfather could borrow money in the 1930s on a handshake because men back then valued their word more than anything else. We must be "men of our word," keeping our com-mitments both locally and internationally.


Announcements—What you say from the pulpit should be "the law of the Medes and Persians." If you constantly alter your word given to the congregation, congregants develop internal questioning about every new piece of direction.


Travel engagements—Frivolous cancelations and no-shows can be devastating to others. There was a pastor in Ni-geria who took 15 different buses to cross Africa to attend a conference in Kenya. When he walked up to the venue, a sign on the door said, "Canceled." It was easy for the American evangelist, but the Nigerian leader wasted one month of his time.


Honesty—Be 100 percent truthful, not 99 percent. Every detail of facts, stories and testimonies must line up with a "court of law" testimony. No wonder they make you swear to tell the "truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth"! Humans have found so many ways to stretch the truth, leave out part of the truth and mix the truth.


Exaggeration is unnecessary. Do we think we have to promote, embellish and market God's image?


Spinning the truth (covering the raw reality of an action) leads the congregation to treat every explanation with sus-picion. Get over it and tell them the truth. The embarrassment will be momentary but the recovery will be permanent.

Purity Is Possible
Moral purity, which means to be faithful to a spouse for a lifetime, has become almost unusual in political, athletic, entertainment and now ministerial arenas. Almost weekly, there is a new revelation of an escapade involving a female or male leader.


Satan has used immorality more than any other vice to destroy the integrity and reputation of the Spirit-filled move-ment, beginning in the late 1980s.


It's an all-out war. The days of feeling that any of us are bullet proof are over. Internet pornography and texting have brought the average leader into the arena of moral temptation as never before.


Samson's parents warned him not to touch the grape, touch the dead and not to cut his hair. It's interesting that he killed a lion in a vineyard. But what was he doing there? He took honey from the carcass or dead body of a lion. It therefore became easy to violate the third and last command when he lay his head in Delilah's lap and she cut his hair.


The point: Simple violations of spiritual protocol lead to deadly results. To avoid moral failure, consider James Dob-son's five stages of adultery and stop before you find yourself engaged in the following:


A look: This was David's initial problem. It's a "connected stare" into the eyes of someone to whom you are not married.


A touch: Physical contact, no matter how slight, can lead to a physical relationship


An embrace: Now the relationship is moving rapidly.


A kiss: This is the fuse that lights immorality.


The act: You commit the ultimate act of unfaithfulness.


Put an Internet filter, such as Integrity Online on your computer, phone and every source of online material. Internet porn marketers sit around all day figuring out how to ensnare you with the latest technology. Your filter must be bullet proof and the password known only to your wife or IT Director. Follow these guidelines to defend yourself against sexual immorality:

  • Never be alone with the opposite sex. This means no lunches, travel and even counseling. I use female staff members to counsel women.

  • Always be accountable for your whereabouts. Your wife should know your schedule intimately and you should never show up across town from where she thought you were going.

  • Travel with a partner. Paul had Silas, Jesus sent them out "two-by-two," and you also need a travel partner.

  • Never allow a woman to share her feelings with you. This is usually a first step to adultery.

  • Block all soft porn mailings to your local post office. A simple signature on a form will keep you and your children safe from pornographic mailings.

  • Block channels that air explicit, sexual programs such as MTV. All cable companies have parent blocks. This should be done not only for you, but also for your children who are now bombarded with pornography at younger and younger ages.

  • Take sexual problems seriously. The best defense is a good offense. Counsel with an overseer if your sexual life is dysfunctional.

  • Beware of R-rated TV shows you watch when your family goes to bed. Most temptation occurs after church when you are the most anointed! You are the target of specific marketing at night, so go to bed when your family does, if necessary.

Be the Example
The third part of the model is your example. There are leadership habits you can demonstrate and others will emu-late and follow. Paul called them "my ways." Here are a few I have tried to demonstrate through the years:


1. Order—God is not the author of confusion. He transformed the multitude into a military at Mt. Sinai. Here are a few things you can check to keep your surroundings in shape:

  • Home Environment: Maintain your lawn, closets, garages and cars. People observe the areas because only an or-ganized mind can produce an orderly environment.

  • Time Management: Punctuality speaks of organized time in services, appointments and commitments

  • Attire: Sloppiness does not reflect good leadership. How would you react to a sloppy president addressing the nation?

  • Work Ethic: Spiritual leaders often take liberties in their daily schedules and output. Refuse the temptation of laziness by being an example to your staff of the hours you put in and the productivity you put out.


2. Courtesy—Believe it or not, the community knows your private side, so watch your example in everyday areas of life such as the checkout line. Those who you are trying to influence note belligerence to a clerk or impatience. Take your time and wait it out.


We would all love to abandon our buggy in Walmart parking lots, but putting it where it belongs is an example to watching eyes. And preaching like an "angel out of heaven" in church then driving like a "bat out of hell" to get home is also observed by your neighbors.


3. Family—Paul spoke of the example family as the main criteria for ministry. This, of course, involves your chil-dren's behavior. In church, after church, in restaurants and at school, everyone is watching your children. They will never be perfect, but they should be accountable and corrected. I know a pastor who has 10 sons and they all behave well at restaurants. That should make you feel better!


And honoring you wife is vital. It not only validates your witness, but it also gets your prayers answered. Walk with her, not in front of her, waving to the adoring masses! Open the exit door and even car door for her. You need to real-ize that at least half (and maybe two-thirds) of your church is female, and they notice your interest and concern for your wife's place in the congregation. Your sons, by the way, will treat their wives the way they observe you treating yours.


These are just a few areas of the model. No wonder the apostle Paul could influence his entire generation, billions down through the ages and millions today with his simple lifestyle.


You may not be pastoring thousands, but if your life is a model for others, your stock is rising! Paul told Timothy, "Be an example to the believers in word, in conduct, in love, in spirit, in faith, in purity" (1 Tim. 4: 12). And John Max-well says, "Be as big a man on the inside as you are on the outside."


Let's rebuild ministry in the United States to once again be as respectable as Billy Graham and his Modesto Mani-festo. A generation is watching, and this is your moment.

Larry Stockstill is the senior pastor of Bethany Prayer Center in Baton Rouge, La., and the author of The Remnant. read more


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