Ministry Today | Serving and empowering church leaders

Are we showing Jesus' grace and compassion, or are we too busy trying to offer our own solutions to people's problems?
Are we showing Jesus' grace and compassion, or are we too busy trying to offer our own solutions to people's problems? (Lightstock)

I recently received a disturbing phone call. A young woman I had been counseling attempted suicide over the weekend.

In God's mercy, He intervened before the overdose could do its lethal damage. But in the aftermath, "Mary's" soul remains raw and bleeding. She doesn't have the strength to fill in a "Discovering Problem Patterns" worksheet or memorize verses right now. Mary needs to grasp the biblical reality that she is precious to the Savior who will not let her go. The promises of Scripture—which are just words to her right now—need to be real in her life.

And I realized anew that I am utterly powerless.  

The training in systematic theology and hermeneutics we have is valuable, in terms of ministering the Scriptures to people who seek answers. Yet there are times, if we are not careful, when our "sound doctrine" may sound like a clanging cymbal and push hurting believers away. This can happen both in the counseling room and in our friendships.

Does this sound like a false dichotomy? It isn't. One of the things God is teaching me lately is that while our words may be true, and biblical, and spoken in love, there is a depth of understanding and compassion that cannot always be expressed verbally ... yet is crucially important.

Sometimes, when faced with another's pain, one simply doesn't know what to say. I have the opposite problem—I always know exactly what to say (and usually which verses to cite).

It's knowing when to shut up that poses the problem for me.

Being Grace-Oriented Before Solutions-Oriented

The plumb line for all counsel is, of course, the Bible. Scripture dictates what we do; not culture. Sound doctrine matters. I want those words engraved on my tombstone!

However, a sticky truth is that people are not formulaic, like computers: We cannot simply reprogram them with a "string code" of certain verses and expect that their hearts will be automatically transformed. Unwittingly, the homework we give to help counselees think biblically may even add "performance pressure," leading to additional condemnation.

As biblical counselors, trained to identify the problem and then apply the biblical solution, this can be frustrating. "Faith is not determined by feelings," we want to protest. We think, "Empathizing with someone is not going to help them—the Word of God is what will fix their problems!" However, Christlike compassion never pits Truth against Love.

We want to help. We love our friends, our family, our counselees. In our desire to help, we need to understand that it is perfectly "theological" to minister to someone who is hurting just by moving toward them in their pain, without preaching. A phone call or email can simply communicate that we care, are praying and, above all, that we are there for them.

There is a time to give a theology lecture; and there is a time to give silent hugs.

Different situations call for different approaches, as Jesus demonstrated in His ministry. Of course, He is the only Counselor with perfect insight into a hurting heart, yet we can and must still learn from His example. In John 11, after the death of Lazarus, Jesus comforts Martha with the promises of God and bolsters her faith. Mary, however, threw herself at His feet weeping. The Lord, far from remaining emotionally detached, cried with her (John 11:32-35).

Mary needed compassionate empathy in the midst of her pain. Likewise, my suicidal counselee will not hear a theology lecture right now. She needs the Jesus who will pick her up off the floor, dry her tears and remind her that her life still has value—to Him, even if to no one else.

Encountering severely depressed believers requires a special patience and sensitivity that we need to seek from the heart of God. Yes, biblical encouragement includes using Scripture wisely. But when one is immobilized in their Christian walk, it is not the best time to unpack all of Ephesians 4. "Putting off" the sin nature and "putting on" the new man seems impossible when just getting out of bed is difficult. While it may be difficult, in these seasons showing Christlike love may mean just sitting next to our friend (or counselee) in the pit. Once they are strong enough to take the first tentative steps of faith, then we can come back to applicable doctrine.

What Does a Supportive, Christian Friend Look Like?

Most of the people we love are not counselees, and are not usually looking for cut-and-dried spiritual advice. Nevertheless, Scripture portrays the Christian life as one of mutual encouragement, correction and exhortation—both within our families and churches (where authority comes into play), and within friendship.

In these precious, rare Christian friendships reminiscent of David and Jonathan, "building up of one another" flows naturally. When a "log jam" in a friend's life occurs, our first instinct is to get proactive and fix it. What better way than to point them to Scripture? Especially when we believe they may be—gasp—backsliding believers.

A popular catch-phrase among evangelicals a few years ago was "What Would Jesus Do?" This is a valid question, but there is just one problem when attempting to discern another's heart: We are not Jesus. We do not have the benefit of His omniscience, nor His insight into all angles of a particular situation. Obviously, in cases of blatant sin (e.g., adultery; theft; habitual drunkenness; pre-marital sex), the loving response would be scriptural confrontation. Supporting someone in sin is neither loving nor Christlike.

But in real life, situations are rarely so clear-cut. What we may consider disobedience may simply be questionable judgment. In our minds, we may be discerning; in our friend's, judgmental. If we are sensitive to the Holy Spirit, God shows us what it means to be "A friend [who] loves at all times" and a "brother in times of adversity" (Prov. 17:17).

Recently, a dear friend said to me, "If you know anything about me, you know I can line up all those Bible verses and teaching and the doctrine and all ... so there is no point in telling me this, as if you're saying something new. I just need to talk to God right now and listen to Him, because right now that preaching doesn't help me."

Love constrained me from retorting, "If you want to 'listen to God,' open the Bible!" I understood the heart behind my friend's words. Where people's lives, situations, emotions and biblical principles converge, a simple verse (or worse, a sense that they are being lectured in a self-righteous way) is not going to encourage them.

And the ultimate irony? I don't want to "be right." I don't want to win an argument, prove a point or beat my friend at a game of Bible Trivia. What I really want is to have a coffee together, put an arm around her shoulder and, most of all, see the joy of Christ flowing in her life. Likewise, when I am confused or feel alone, knowing that a trusted friend is praying for me brings far more comfort than being hammered and peppered with confrontation.

Once God has "poured out His love in our hearts" (Rom. 5:5), loving people comes more naturally. While it is often not easy or automatic, we long to share the liberating truth of the gospel with others—and help those close to us apply it to their lives. Even when our motives are pure, godly counsel may not be received that way if we wield it without tenderness. It is far more difficult to patiently support, silently love and unceasingly pray than to exegete a passage of Scripture. We need to seek the Holy Spirit regularly for discernment in our approach, in order to be truly competent counselors and compassionate friends.

Marie Notcheva (B.A., Print Journalism, Syracuse University) is a writer and biblical counselor from Massachusetts who specializes in eating disorders. She is a graduate of Jay Adams' Institute for Nouthetic Studies, and counsels at her home church, Heritage Bible Chapel, in Princeton, Massachusetts. She and her husband, Ivaylo, are the parents of four children. Following a 17-year battle with anorexia and bulimia, Marie began studying biblical counseling and realized the principles she had learned during her own recovery could be used to help others.

For the original article, visit churchleaders.com.

Leaders are readers! Subscribe now and get 3 magazines for the price of 1. Get Ministry Today, Charisma and SpiritLed Woman all for $24. YES - I'm a leader!

Ministry Today Subscription Special - Subscribe to Ministry Today magazine today and get 12 issues (2 full years) plus Amplified Leadership, a free leadership book for only $24.

Your Turn

Comment Guidelines
View/Add Comments
Use Desktop Layout
Ministry Today Magazine — Serving and empowering church leaders